Where to buy components for my next build??

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Hey Guys...

So I'm looking to build a Super Bass and want to source the components to put it together. The most important part is that the Chassis (steel) will fit all the sockets, jacks, PT,OT, choke, etc without having to retrofit or drill extra holes, which is a PIA. Ideally, I would like to buy everything from one place to save on shipping. I live in Chinada, so shipping is expensive coming from the US. I looked at Valvestorm website but have never ordered from them so I don't know their reputation. Mojotone has stuff but much of it is out of stock or back ordered. Tubedepot and Antique Electronic Supply only have part of the kit (not all the pieces) so I'm concerned that things won't fit together. I would also like a recommendation on someone that makes an excellent Turret Board.

PS: I would also like a recommendation on hookup wire brand (solid core 22 gauge). I found silicon wire to be too soft to work with.

Thanks
 

Dblgun

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Valvestorm has good stuff and their "Plexi wire kit" is pretty decent wire for the project you have in mind. Metro doesn't have kits anymore that I know of but the manual for those kits are still out there and can be printed. The manual has a parts list that would be helpful and the instructions are photo illustrated and contain both lead/bass variations. I'm not sure how much you are wanting to to stay to 100% stock appearing.

It wasn't clear if you want to "specify" all the parts for your project just from the same source or you're wanting a kit. You may want to consider a kit or part of a kit from Ceriatone. Nik puts together a pretty nice product which are pretty reasonable. You can get kits or individual items and I know some folks buy the kits less "iron" and then get thier transformers/choke from their preferred vendor.

I'm kinda anal and super cheap so tend to want to source every component and buy them in quantites where I can get them cheap! I enjoy building the chassis and boards so I can put things where I want them and again I'm cheap!

As far as solid core wire I seldom use it with the exception of filament wiring on Fender Tweed style builds which is cloth covered and not appropriate for your SL build.

Have fun with your build.
 
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Valvestorm has good stuff and their "Plexi wire kit" is pretty decent wire for the project you have in mind. Metro doesn't have kits anymore that I know of but the manual for those kits are still out there and can be printed. The manual has a parts list that would be helpful and the instructions are photo illustrated and contain both lead/bass variations. I'm not sure how much you are wanting to to stay to 100% stock appearing.

It wasn't clear if you want to "specify" all the parts for your project just from the same source or you're wanting a kit. You may want to consider a kit or part of a kit from Ceriatone. Nik puts together a pretty nice product which are pretty reasonable. You can get kits or individual items and I know some folks buy the kits less "iron" and then get thier transformers/choke from their preferred vendor.

I'm kinda anal and super cheap so tend to want to source every component and buy them in quantites where I can get them cheap! I enjoy building the chassis and boards so I can put things where I want them and again I'm cheap!

As far as solid core wire I seldom use it with the exception of filament wiring on Fender Tweed style builds which is cloth covered and not appropriate for your SL build.

Have fun with your build.

Wow.. you build your own chassis! I guess you have a good tool shop. Question: why don't you like solid core wire?
 

Dblgun

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Yes, getting a chassis done requires a few tools but nothing all that elaborate. Sometimes there are no chassis availabe commercially. I don't think solid core works well for me because it does not bend (flow)the same as multistrand. Solid core is also very sensitive to repeated movement and I find breaks easy in most applications. Like I mentioned before I do like cloth covered 18ga solid for filament wiring in Fender Tweed builds and it solders nicely.
 
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Yes, getting a chassis done requires a few tools but nothing all that elaborate. Sometimes there are no chassis availabe commercially. I don't think solid core works well for me because it does not bend (flow)the same as multistrand. Solid core is also very sensitive to repeated movement and I find breaks easy in most applications. Like I mentioned before I do like cloth covered 18ga solid for filament wiring in Fender Tweed builds and it solders nicely.

so do u have a CAD drawing to layout the punch holes for the chassis? sounds like machine shop stuff.
 

neikeel

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+1 for Valvestorm. The chassis are perfect (they were spec.d by George at Metro) and the decent Belton sockets fit. The boards fit and all the hardware kits have all you need.
The wire is excellent and I still buy it into the U.K. as I cannot find pretinned multi strand that handles and solders so well. Also the bus wire and sheathing is in the right size.
I like Marstran iron.
 
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+1 for Valvestorm. The chassis are perfect (they were spec.d by George at Metro) and the decent Belton sockets fit. The boards fit and all the hardware kits have all you need.
The wire is excellent and I still buy it into the U.K. as I cannot find pretinned multi strand that handles and solders so well. Also the bus wire and sheathing is in the right size.
I like Marstran iron.
Thanks brother..
 

Dblgun

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so do u have a CAD drawing to layout the punch holes for the chassis? sounds like machine shop stuff.

No, I don't have a CAD drawing, everything is just measured after I determine the layout. Again, if you're dealing with a given layout then you've got some options. For the SL you can get a chassis ready to assemble and as Neil mentioned the Valvestorm chassis are very good. If you wanted to vary the layout you could get a blank chassis or oe with only P/T and EIC cutouts. You could then use your preferred face/back plates to determine the component layout.

I sometimes buy material and then shear and brake the material to the desired demensions. I have found that punching the chassis prior to "breaking" does not yeild best results. The shear and break I use is at a friends shop so is not something everyone has. You can buy blank chassis in various dimensions and then drill and/or punch to your desired specs. I use painters/masking tape to cover the chassis and then straits and squares to begin the layout. You can make changes along the way until you have your layout decided then use a spring punch to mark your start point for all your components. Then use chassis punches, drill/step bits and rotary files for finishing.

Interested in seeing your project progress, keep us posted!
 

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Guitar-Rocker

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What Neikell said. Valvestorm is the component benchmark that others are measured by.

You may not find any quality total kits where everything fits without tooling. "True Quality" in a kit is really lacking, because nobody wants to pay what it costs to offer a true quality kit . You may get a kit where everything bolts up well, but a large percentage of the components are just average.
 

_Steve

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Option B, as you are in Canadia you could maybe source a cheap/broken Traynor and do a conversion. I can't remember the model name but one of them is almost exactly a Super Lead and the transformers are said to be high quality as well.

EDIT: I did a quick search out of interest and the model is a YBA-1. Its actually closer to a Bass-spec than Lead-spec - so much so that it may not even be enough of a challenge for you.
 
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thetragichero

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any of the yba (bassmaster) should work. different numbers indicated head/combo
yba-1a is a heck of an amp but i always outfit with a pair of 6550s because 80-90w out of two modern production 6ca7 is sure to result in shorter tube life. they're very nice amps
 
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Option B, as you are in Canadia you could maybe source a cheap/broken Traynor and do a conversion. I can't remember the model name but one of them is almost exactly a Super Lead and the transformers are said to be high quality as well.

EDIT: I did a quick search out of interest and the model is a YBA-1. Its actually closer to a Bass-spec than Lead-spec - so much so that it may not even be enough of a challenge for you.
Excellent idea.
 

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