What would you do?

Discussion in 'Marshall Amps' started by MikeyDude, Aug 30, 2021.

  1. MikeyDude

    MikeyDude Member

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    Hi guys! I've got a 1974 Super Lead 100 MK II (6550s) - 100% stock (except the hard wired power cord got frayed and was replaced). It was my main amp for years. It's dangerously loud... LOL!

    It has been retired for a long time because I've gotten other amps and kinda moved on from it. I'm considering using it but I'm nervous because it's so old and such a collector I don't want to risk damage to it. I'd hate to blow a transformer or something that would ruin the originality of it.

    The thing is - I don't need it. I have 3 other Marshalls that I use.

    So what would you do?
     
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  2. PowerTube44

    PowerTube44 Well-Known Member

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  3. MikeyDude

    MikeyDude Member

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    Nooo... Not going to get rid of it. We have too much history together. I definitely don't want a reissue. But that is exactly my point. Playing it could potentially cause some unforeseen damage that could ruin the collect-ability of it. :)
     
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  4. marshallmellowed

    marshallmellowed Well-Known Member

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    If it was working when you last played it, I'd say fire it up! Leave it on standby for about 5 to 10 minutes, if everything seems kosher, take it out of standby an see what you get. I bet it'll work fine, but may have some scratchy pots. Keep in mind, I've never taken an amp (or any piece of electronics) to a tech. I do all my own work, so I'm a little less paranoid/concerned about these things. :)
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2021
  5. crossroadsnyc

    crossroadsnyc Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    If you're concerned, then take it into a tech and have them bring it up to speed.
     
  6. Jethro Rocker

    Jethro Rocker Well-Known Member

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    I agree. No point having it if it never gets played, ever. Hard on caps etc.
     
  7. C-Grin

    C-Grin Well-Known Member

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    Take it to an amp teck and have them give it a start up and see what it needs to use.
     
  8. MarshallDog

    MarshallDog Well-Known Member

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    I would have it serviced, cleaned up and tested with new tubes. Then I would get a good attenuator and use it when you feel it will be safe.
     
  9. MonstersOfTheMidway

    MonstersOfTheMidway Well-Known Member

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    sell it or trade it for something else you like/need/want.
     
  10. sunflower

    sunflower Member

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    Electrolytic caps might be harmed by turning on due to long term storage.
    It would be better to go through cap reforming process before just turning on this amp, regarding such a stock condition.
     
  11. ricksdisconnected

    ricksdisconnected Well-Known Member

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  12. dro

    dro Well-Known Member

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    This
    Needs to be slowly charged so as not to shock the caps.
    If they hold, great. If not. repair it, and rock out.
     
  13. crossroadsnyc

    crossroadsnyc Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah, he didn't mention how long it's been sitting in storage, but if it's long enough that it raises a concern, you should listen to your own intuition. If I had an amp sitting around for 6-12 months w/out turning it on, then I would't hesitate ... but if it's been sitting there for years, I think I'd play it safe.

    Interesting aside, but I wonder if there is a definitive length of time for an amp to be sitting unused where you should always play it safe? 1/5/10/etc years? I honestly don't know, as I've never had one sitting around that long, and haven't given it much thought. If any experts like @neikeel could give some advice on this, it would be great information for all of us to keep in mind for the future.
     
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  14. MikeyDude

    MikeyDude Member

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    Yeah - it's been a while, but I don't have a problem letting it go unused. Like I said I have other amps that I am using all the time now, and this has been retired. Breaking it out would be more for the nostalgia and fun of it than wanting to make a work tool out of it. I also guess I didn't realize that having it go unused would cause any problems for it. It's something I'll need to look into. Thanks for the heads up!
     
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  15. junk notes

    junk notes Well-Known Member

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  16. crossroadsnyc

    crossroadsnyc Senior Moderator Staff Member

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    You're welcome, but I wouldn't have known that w/out learning from a lot of the guys we have here on the forum. Believe me, you're in the right place, and the advice you can get here from many of the seasoned experts will ensure that not only will the amp be properly taken care of, but will give you many more years of nostalgic fun!
     
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  17. william vogel

    william vogel Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    You should build yourself a light bulb limiter and start it up slowly. Buy a 40, 60 and 100 watt incandescent bulb. Start with the 40 watt and run it for about 5 minutes and work up to the 100 watt bulb. If anything is wrong, you have protection. The 40 watt bulb is going to be very bright and may not dim. The 60 and 100 watt bulbs will start bright and dim slowly. With the 100 watt bulb, you’ll still only get about 300 volts to the power tubes depending on bias. After the full slow start of all the levels of bulbs, the amp should be safe to full power. It’s a good idea to do this. A variac can also be used but with the limiter in series to provide fault protection.
     
  18. GregM

    GregM Well-Known Member

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    That! ^^^^^^^
    I'm sure I read this another post about 10 months ago.
    Slowly increase!
     
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  19. marshallmellowed

    marshallmellowed Well-Known Member

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  20. TheToneDig

    TheToneDig Well-Known Member

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    It sounds like you aren't the kinda person to keep this in a barn and exposed to the elements. If you didn't use a dust cover you can give it an air spray like you use to clean computers to get rid of dust-burning smells when it heats up. Just don't crank it right away. Build up slowly to it when the amp is running optimized (heated up). I bet there is a very high chance it should be fine. That's just me though and the tech advice is good if you are really worried about something frying but honestly, those vintage amps are built to last and I have seen some beat-up ones running just fine. Seems to me when stuff blows it has less to do with age and more statistical like when tubes go. Obviously, though the older things are the more those statistics change. So unless its been kept somewhere damp or abused, I would go for it.
     
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