Silver Jubilee - Vintage Vs Reissue

Discussion in 'Marshall Amps' started by dslman, May 2, 2016.

  1. dslman

    dslman Well-Known Member

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    Wow,thats a lot to go through, I thought I was serious about tone..Very interesting.
     
  2. thegaindeli

    thegaindeli Well-Known Member

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    I did the first two, only because there were cold joints and cooked caps. Hand-wiring amplifiers, especially when using lead-free solder is tricky. You need to use heat-sinks on every connection point you can, plenty of flux, and RoHS rated components. An additional second of heat, and you can easily let the smoke out! PCB boards go through a flow table process, with time and temperatures regulated. Marshall, Mesa, Fender, etc... These guys have the science down! I would not be one bit concerned about the quality of any new amp soldered with lead-free material.

    This was my personal experience with lead-free solder. I can't say one is better than the other, nor would I presume to be so bold. Some players may actually like the difference, and pursue a 2555X over a 2555. Warm cuddly tones are great, but not always conducive, especially when playing in a band situation. That "sizzle" that bothered you so much playing solo, is going to be exactly what you need to cut-through the mix. One of the best live amps I've ever heard is the SLO100. Playing it solo isn't my idea of ideal tone, but put that bad boy into a mix, and it's all over! VOX AC15/30, Mesa Mark Series, Cornford RK100, Soldano SLO100, and nearly every Marshall JMP/JCM I've ever played... These are my favorites for great live tone. A Flying V helps too! ;)
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2016
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  3. plexilespaul

    plexilespaul Well-Known Member

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    i think we can just say that in all honesty they are two completly different amp minus the diagram circuit that the re issue is designed uppon. take your pick but don't expect it to be the same amp. it's pretty much like trying to compare a kk jcm 800 to an 1981 jcm 800...not the same amp so why bother...(and yes they all sound close hint-there is a marshall badge on top of them both).
     
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  4. marshallmellowed

    marshallmellowed Well-Known Member

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    Yes, even if all the same components were used (which they were not), just the difference in the physical layout of the two PCB's could result in a tonal difference.
     
  5. marshalled

    marshalled Active Member

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    On mine 2555X the first step is changing the stock preamp Valve.

    On video I placed 3 SOVTEK 12ax7wb ...the sound and tone is much better and near to the original amp!

    May be fantastic to change the output valve..but i don't want change (100 euro of valves) on a new amps!
     
  6. temporarychicken

    temporarychicken Active Member

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    The current range of re-issues are excellent.

    Marshall struggle with their new s**t sometimes, but they can still build the old s**t just as well as the original s**t back in the day (maybe even better in fact)

    Also, an apples for apples comparison is never possible. Most vintage Jubilee heads will have been updated with different valve/tubes, repairs, etc. and had wear and tear on the pots and other components. It's almost impossible to find a mint vintage jubilee head with no repairs and it's original complement of valves/tubes intact, and still sounding fresh.

    The re-issues all contain FX loops which makes them exceptionally useful for stuff like post-EQ and delay which you can't do on a vintage lump.

    So vintage vs. re-issue is not really a fair comparison. What I can tell you though, is that my 2014 JCM800 2203 re-issue is absolutely fantastic and I would not trade it for a vintage lump any day.
     
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  7. thegaindeli

    thegaindeli Well-Known Member

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    All original 2550 here. :)

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 13, 2016
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  8. Frankiepags

    Frankiepags Member

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    Reissue is definitely a lil brighter , still sounds killer for sure. There's one at our job and everyone loves it...just think there reissue stuff is a lil over priced. I guess it's a jubilee and if someone wants 1 they are gonna pay for 1.
     
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  9. Mike Vilogi

    Mike Vilogi New Member

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    that reminds me of story i heard where studio was wired in all silver, and it ended up sounding supppper bad so they had to redo it with normal solder.
     
  10. Buzzard

    Buzzard Well-Known Member

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    I would'nt give up my reissue for an original.It does exactly what I want it to do.
     
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  11. JacksonCharvelAddict

    JacksonCharvelAddict Well-Known Member

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    The problem with the originals is that some of them sounded a lot worse than others. Add to that the fact some components could be starting to wear out and the reissue is suddenly a good deal. The reissues are a lot more consistent than the old ones used to be. The tolerances on new components is a lot lower than it used to be in the 80's. I tried looking for an original but all of them I found didn't sound anywhere near as good as the reissuee did. The only exception was a 2555SL that Guitar Center had. That one sounded pretty much the same as the 2555x. The 2555SL seems to go for a lot less than an original jubilee too. I just wish Marshall would release a 50 watt Jubilee. The original 50 watt Jubilee combos are great and I would buy a reissue of those in a heart beat.
     
  12. RickyLee

    RickyLee Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    I'm with the gaindeli on that one. I have acquired quite a few vintage amps over the years that looked to have their original OEM glass intact. Yeah, I can not say that the amps were in a time capsule before I got them never having their knobs turned ( hmmm . . . .). But, there were a few instances where I pulled the glass and labeled what positions I pulled them from. Wrote down voltages, bias supply settings. One example is when I got my 1984 Marshall vertical input 4010. That thing was just magical sounding. So I decided to document all that stuff and then put new fresh glass in her. The sound did change a bit for the worse, though still a good sounding amp. Those old 6550's might have held most of the goodness. But then, I am remembering it had Tungsram 12AX7's too. I did swap the speaker out on that 4010 as well.
     
  13. nix_gibby

    nix_gibby Active Member

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    If Joe Bonamassa would play 2555x on a concert, everyone would say that reissue is great amp and that it sounds exactly the same as the original. Hence, 2555x is great amp if you know how to use it.
     
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  14. ampeq

    ampeq Well-Known Member

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  15. Buzzard

    Buzzard Well-Known Member

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    I'm not a fan of the lower wattage amps but understand those that need and like them.But there is a compromise between a 20/25 w vs a 50/100 w amp. I'd rather play the bigger amps at a lower volume they just sound "bigger". But then I'm not gigging regularly and hauling them around.
     
  16. JacksonCharvelAddict

    JacksonCharvelAddict Well-Known Member

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    I think 50w is the sweet spot for the best of both worlds. Loud enough to play any gig and you don't need to crank it quite as much to get that power amp cooking. A Jubilee 50watt with a 25watt triode mode would be perfect for most uses.
     
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  17. Kelia

    Kelia Well-Known Member

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    Would someone know if using the lower wattage mode ,...the power tubes wear faster ,
    calling @ampmadscientist maybe !
     
  18. JacksonCharvelAddict

    JacksonCharvelAddict Well-Known Member

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    That is a great question. I have been curious about that as well. I know running a hotter bias will wear the tube faster. Not sure how pentode or triode operation would effect wear. My guess is it is probably about the same.
     
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  19. Kelia

    Kelia Well-Known Member

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    I'm asking cause iirc ,.I've heard Dave Friedman talk about this with one
    of the invited tech guest on Tone-Talk but can't remember what the answer was ?
     
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  20. JacksonCharvelAddict

    JacksonCharvelAddict Well-Known Member

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    Tone Talk is great stuff. Hopefully someone here will chime in.
     
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