Peavey 5150....these were popular????

Rudy v

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To tamed the noise levels you can build some noise gate with 2 1n4148 15975705217956631053336158252035.jpg 15975707281361348042738699771569.jpg
 

johnny q

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Hey - the 5150 worked well for EVH, Steve Morse and Nugent, so they can't be total shite! :) I have a 6505+ and it's not unusable due to noise. However, I did read on another forum that a lot of players prefer a noise gate in the effects loops for the 5150/6505 line of amps, so there may be something to it. But that guy diming the gain on the lead channel - yikes! That is for sure the root of all evil.
 

oafyuf

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The preamp board is connected via a few ribbon cables with push-on connectors over PC board mounted pins. None are even gold plated. This is not a reliability plus said:
I've just had one in from a local recording studio and they use it a lot for tracking chuggy metal guys. It's very highly regarded in that scenario. I agree the physical design is pretty bad. This particular one has been having trouble with the volume dropping out and then coming back up. It's a common issue with 5150s that's often resolved by cleaning the FX loop connections. Not in this case, though.

The valve (tube) holders on the pre-amp PCB were a mess, and serviced less than a year ago! I think the design where a rubber strip under the pre-amp lid presses down on the 12AX7s/ECC83s must be causing arcing on the valve holders (tube sockets) and also putting a flex strain on the traces in the PCB.

I also noticed a lot of microphonics coming from the ribbon cables connecting the pre-amp PCB to the main PCB so I tore them all out and soldered in "real" wire. Did the same for the FX loop ribbon cable! It sounds clearer and stronger - and doesn't drop out any more - but if it comes back in with the same problem, I'll be looking at repairing/replacing that pre-amp PCB.

Regarding noise... well it's noisy when the high-gain channel is cranked but otherwise not. Not as bad as a Fender Sunn Model T, f'rinstance!

IMG_20200806_170041.jpg IMG_20200806_170059.jpg
 

What?

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^ That is the sort of stuff right there that has me running away from modern pcb constructed amps. I don't want to be a guinea pig for engineering of ever cheaper construction and workaround repairs attempting to correct those sorts of issues. Big companies such as Peavey, Marshall, and Fender have been producing guitar amps for 50-70 years. Reliability, durability, and serviceability should be much better today, not worse than even early designs.

I just had a 'ah to hell with it' moment yesterday and was going to go ahead and grab a DSL1H as a practice amp. But nope.
 
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tallcoolone

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^ That is the sort of stuff right there that has me running away from modern pcb constructed amps. I don't want to be a guinea pig for engineering of ever cheaper construction and workaround repairs attempting to correct those sorts of issues. Big companies such as Peavey, Marshall, and Fender have been producing guitar amps for 50-70 years. Reliability, durability, and serviceability should be much better today, not worse than even early designs.

I just had a 'ah to hell with it' moment yesterday and was going to go ahead and grab a DSL1H as a practice amp. But nope.
I think the guinea pigs for the Peavey 5150 died of old age about 8-10 years ago
 

Gunner64

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I have Pcb based amps that are 40 years old and still running strong, with no catastrophic failure of the boards in any way. Are they as easy to work on as my turret based amps? No. There are precautions that come with working on pcbs, but the only issue I ever had with my old Pcb Marshalls, Engl and Randall amps are cap changes. Other than that they have been pretty damn reliable, including a gigged to shit 2204 I bought new.

High gain amps are just noisier. Nature of the beast. Add an extra gain stage to your turret based amp and see.

I had a 5150 and it was just too hot for my tastes, I didn't max the gain so I really didn't have any uncontrollable noise issues.

Any high gain amp with the gain maxxed will be noisy, not just the 5150.
 

Riffraff

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Gain on 10 and complaining about it being noisy. :rolleyes:
:wtf: do you expect?

I have a 6505+ that's not noisy at all.

mKH5N4N.jpg


A friend bought it as a non-working amp sold for parts at a yard sale for $25. He brought it to me and asked me to take a look at it to see if I could spot a problem. I noticed the filament circuit was out and started looking around for something fried. It took no time at all to spot it. Do you see it?

7FM4qAX.jpg

A closer look.

QH106EL.jpg


The ribbon cable connecting the preamp pcb to the power pcb had a burnt plug. I pulled the ribbon cable, inspected and cleaned the pin header then hard wired the boards together by soldering wire jumpers pin to pin. Then I replaced a dead EHX tube that was in a cathode follower position in the preamp. :nono:
I fired it up and fell in love. I traded him a '78 Vibro Champ I had owned for 30 years and never liked and a vintage Orpheum branded 112 6AQ5 powered combo made by Univox. After it became mine I replaced the worn 6L6GC's with a matched set of Ruby's and put a bunch of early '90s Beijing high gain 12AX7's in the preamp. It's an amazing sounding rock amp with the gain controls on 5. Guys that HATE 5150's have told me it doesn't sound like any 5150/5050 II they have ever heard. It's a keeper. :agreed:
 

Jethro Rocker

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^ That is the sort of stuff right there that has me running away from modern pcb constructed amps. I don't want to be a guinea pig for engineering of ever cheaper construction and workaround repairs attempting to correct those sorts of issues. Big companies such as Peavey, Marshall, and Fender have been producing guitar amps for 50-70 years. Reliability, durability, and serviceability should be much better today, not worse than even early designs.

I just had a 'ah to hell with it' moment yesterday and was going to go ahead and grab a DSL1H as a practice amp. But nope.
The PCB ones give you, what, 30 years? How old are you? It may outlast you. Just sayin. If you want a DSL for practice go ahead. It will need the odd tube change like anytying else.
My 4010 is from 1982 and now needs caps. The rest is original.
Oh no! My Silver Jubilee I bought new in 1987 (33 yrs for reference) has diodes n things in it. Unserviceable. But then again, all it has ever needed is tubes.
I am ok with this.
 

Matthews Guitars

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After talking to the owner about his setup, to make a long story short, after I asked him to check out a few things with his other 5150 (same version) that was experiencing the same problem.....it turned out to be an issue that disappeared when he bypassed his pedal board and plugged straight in.

Getting him to admit that was a challenge.

So...as suspected, it was never the amp. Sucker's still noisy as hell when set the way he used it, though.

I did find that he had a weak tube which I replaced. But it hadn't failed in that amp...yet.

So I got a decent service charge for really not having to fix anything. Not a bad day. And any time I get to play around with a different amp, I'm happy to do it.
 

Adieu

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After talking to the owner about his setup, to make a long story short, after I asked him to check out a few things with his other 5150 (same version) that was experiencing the same problem.....it turned out to be an issue that disappeared when he bypassed his pedal board and plugged straight in.

Getting him to admit that was a challenge.

So...as suspected, it was never the amp. Sucker's still noisy as hell when set the way he used it, though.

I did find that he had a weak tube which I replaced. But it hadn't failed in that amp...yet.

So I got a decent service charge for really not having to fix anything. Not a bad day. And any time I get to play around with a different amp, I'm happy to do it.


....yeah, that's kind of different than what you were saying earlier.
 

What?

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The PCB ones give you, what, 30 years? How old are you? It may outlast you. Just sayin. If you want a DSL for practice go ahead. It will need the odd tube change like anytying else.
My 4010 is from 1982 and now needs caps. The rest is original.
Oh no! My Silver Jubilee I bought new in 1987 (33 yrs for reference) has diodes n things in it. Unserviceable. But then again, all it has ever needed is tubes.
I am ok with this.

I don't think that way. After getting my old Fender amps and seeing how they are built and knowing that they have been through multiple owners and still kick ass after 55 years and 46 years and who knows how many hours of play and how many gigs, it just doesn't make sense to me for an amp to be built any lesser, not sounding as good and ending up in a land fill. The reissues of these amps are very different sounding and constructed and have had problems since their initial release. These old Fenders have been reliable and will likely be around long after I'm gone and still be serviceable. Had these amps been built in the modern way, so many players wouldn't own them today and understand what a really good amp is.
 

Matthews Guitars

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Actually if you read the initial post again, what I ended up with was still what I started out with. The questionable preamp tube I replaced wasn't a significant factor, in fact that tube was found to be weak when tested in the highest gain circuit of a different amp. (My Mesa Dual Rectifier. V1 (clean green channel) on those amps has higher gain in a single stage than any other part of their circuit.)
 

Matthews Guitars

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As for the PC board discussion, a high quality PC board made with thick traces, plated thru holes, and solder masked, made on a G10 or FR4 substrate, should last the whole life of the amp unless it gets cooked by too much heat. But point to point or turret board construction is of course much better from an amp tweaker's perspective, and allows for component replacement working from just one side of the board. They both have their advantages. I prefer turret board or point to point wiring in my own amps but for large scale production of an amp that will probably never be modified, good quality PC boards are the way to go.
 

Adieu

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Afaik, PCB production is pretty much fully automated, while P2P/turret is all by hand.

All depends on your readiness to pay for labor... of course, you CAN temporarily pay starvation wages in some underprivileged area, but that doesn't last long once they get competitive AND/OR doesn't provide any kind of reliability, because unfair pay and dirt-poor workers does not for pride in quality make.

And then there's the ethics of it all, too
 

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