Opinions on electric guitar strings

Discussion in 'Guitars' started by Vinsanitizer, Jun 4, 2020.

  1. Vinsanitizer

    Vinsanitizer Forum Support Spec. Double Platinum Supporting Member VIP Member

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    I've been using those for the last 8 years. They really are great strings, but lately I started noticing that the E and B strings seem to be contributing a bit more to fret buzz. Nor so much a buzz, but a thin tone. Recently I've gone to Ernie Ball Slinky's (10's, my usual gauge) and that seems to be an improvement. Another thing I [think] I notice is that EB's seem a little harder to bend. Can anyone with experience comment on this?
    .
     
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  2. Dean Swindell

    Dean Swindell Active Member

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    I used Slinkys from about 76 to 95 when I got a 12-pack of D'Addario for Christmas. After that the Slinkys felt abrasive, as if they weren't properly buffed or something.
    The Fenders are very nice. Dean Markley, all I ever see are the Cryogenic ones but a few years ago they put out "reissues" of their 70s string with the cool farmhouse labeling. They were nice, but discontinued.
    My main strings are GHS Boomers, very lively, reliable and stable. For a change, less zing and more chime I go with D'Addario or Fender. Sometimes I think the Fender high E and B have a more solid tone than the others. Hope that helps.
     
  3. TheCount0212

    TheCount0212 Member

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    I always have my guitars refretted w/ Jescar stainless steel jumbo frets. Absolutely ZERO evidence of fret wear after 10 years on one of my guitars!
     
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  4. TXOldRedRocker

    TXOldRedRocker Well-Blown Member* Gold Supporting Member

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    My latest try are EB's Slinky Cobalt. Put them on a Strat with some nice Seymour Duncan pickups. Really smooth and a clear rich sound. I have lots of strings that I try, but stick mostly with EB's on Strats and mostly D'Addario's on LP's.
    EB2723-large.jpg
     
  5. Vinsanitizer

    Vinsanitizer Forum Support Spec. Double Platinum Supporting Member VIP Member

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    LOL! I just tried a pack of 10's of those on one of my Les Pauls a week and a half ago, and they almost exploded my amp's speaker!

    JK. But they are VERY different from regular strings - way more low end and a darker sound. I took them back off after about 20 minutes.
    That's not to say they're bad strings at all, they just weren't what I was hoping for, for my style of playing.
    .
     
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  6. TXOldRedRocker

    TXOldRedRocker Well-Blown Member* Gold Supporting Member

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    Yea, not sure how they'd sound on Humbuckers. But on an SSS Strat with a wide variety of pickups like I have with the SD's, The tone variety is very wide. They can be very 50's bright loud on the bridge, to very dark and hollow fat on the neck.
     
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  7. Vinsanitizer

    Vinsanitizer Forum Support Spec. Double Platinum Supporting Member VIP Member

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    That's a great idea - I bet they'd go well with single coils. I'd bought 2 packs, still have one, so I'll try the other set on my Tele.
     
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  8. Marshall Boogie

    Marshall Boogie Well-Known Member

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    The reason is simple as to why the EB feels abrasive, they are square strings (actually I think it is more parallelogram, but you get the point). D'addario are round strings and hold up well (I actually believe the cores are round on the wound string as well, a lot of manufacturers use square cores also on the wound strings, I believe I heard that the square cores cuts the life some). String preference is totally subjective, they all mostly sound similar, but the round strings just feel better on my fingers.(especially slides up and down the fretboard....absolutely hate the slinky's for that). If gripping the strings is your problem then Slinky's are probably for you (they seem to stick to your fingers better because of the sharp edges), but if you are like me and that isn't an issue, then the comfort of D'addario is more preferrable.
     
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  9. El Gringo

    El Gringo Well-Known Member

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    I use to use Dean Markley strings and loved them , the reason I had to switch to the Ernie Balls was the place I shop stopped carrying them . The Ernie Balls work just fine and I like them .
     
  10. El Gringo

    El Gringo Well-Known Member

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    Just reading above posts that Dean Markley discontinued my old strings with the farmhouse on the cover/label
     
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  11. IOSEPHVS

    IOSEPHVS Well-Known Member

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    Nothing ends a good argument like an opinion. Back in my Fender phase, I used Ernie Ball Super Slinky. When I bought my Parker, I switched to D'Addario EXL120. I have gone through many broken Ernie Ball G strings. I have yet to break a D'Addario string, and they stay in tune for days, even weeks at a time, plus they sound great.
     
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  12. krunchy

    krunchy New Member

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    I started with EB and DM’s in the mid 70’s and switched to D’addario’s a few yrs later for two reasons; tuning stability and breakage. I had a couple of LP’s that would eat B strings, after switching to D’addario’s it stopped. Have used D’s primarily since. They seem to last a little longer than EB and Markley do.

    One thing to remember is that everybody’s chemical make up is a lil different and strings that last a long time for some is not always the case for others.



    I also used SIT’s for awhile very stable and good with the tremolo. Love the EB Stainless steel strings but stopped using them because of fret wear.

    Using the newer Aluminum/Bronze EB’s for the Martin, best strings Ive ever used for a steel string acoustic.
     
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  13. Jamil Jabr

    Jamil Jabr New Member

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    GHS Nickel Rockers
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2020
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  14. Joerocker39

    Joerocker39 New Member

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    In the past I have used
    Ernie Ball (they sucked)
    Ddario they worked good
    Dean Markkey worked great

    on both of my guitars I use
    S. I.T. strings

    On my Wolfgang I use 9 to 42
    On my Iommi Epiphone I use 10-42

    they are awesome and probably the best strings

    Joe
     
  15. James Jarby

    James Jarby New Member

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    When I was a kid dreaming about gear I’d read interviews with my guitar heroes, and Hendrix, Clapton, Duane Allman, Rory Gallagher & many others described using Fender Rock N’ Roll 150 strings, which are semi-flat.

    Years later when I worked in a guitar store I was told that those Fender strings were manufactured by GHS. I remember they were called Gus strings and now they’re called Nickel Rockers, described here from the GHS web site:
    Rollerwound pure nickel wrapped with a round, pure nickel cover that is slightly flattened by metal rollers during the winding process. Bright-sounding, great-feeling strings. GHS has made the highest-quality strings since 1964.

    They cost a bit more because of the extra step of rolling the string. When Boomers and similar strings (Slinky, etc.) came out that didn’t flatten the windings I saw it as a huge marketing gimmick because they were telling people that they were getting something better (cooler, whatever) when it was actually cheaper to make those strings.

    The flattening of a Nickel Rocker is very subtle and you may not notice much difference between them or something like Boomers, but I just love them. They are a “classic” string and you might want to give them a try. You might also get less fret wear since the strings don’t have as much of a file-like edge, but if you like sliding your pick up and down the strings a lot like Angus use Slinky strings like he does.

    I know that Stevie Ray Vaughan used Nickel Rockers because we worked with him and he had them in custom packs that had his name stamped on them at the factory. The lightest string was a .012.

    One other thing is that since we were repairing guitars we would buy each string by the gross. When purchased like this they are shipped flat and straight in long plastic bags, which is really nice, but 144 x 6 is a lot of strings!
     
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  16. TM1

    TM1 Member

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    Personally, I think all those sets are junk/crap! They use the cheapest materials to make them. the wound strings have larger core wires and smaller wraps. The wrap is the most expensive part so by using a larger core and smaller wrap you get a string that costs less to produce.
    From the `50's until about 1972/73, string manufactures used a small wrap, large Round core. These were all round core, pure nickle sets. Then everyone went to a large Hex Core and a small wrap of Nickle Plated steel. They cost next to nothing to produce, wore out quicker and sounded like crap. All the plain strings were Tin plated steel and tin plated steel hex cores for wound strings. They traditionally had been silver plated steel wire. A few companies used Monel Wire for wraps. Monel has a nice warm, uncompressed sound. A little less output from Monel, but nice tone.
    There's only one company making Monel wrapped wound strings with a round core and that's the German made Pyramid Strings.
    They use silver plated German Steel for plain strings and core wires & either pure Nickle wraps or Monel wraps. Their strings last about 5-6 times longer than any of the rubbish that EB, D'Addario, etc make Gibson Strings have been made by D'Addario for the last 12-15 years, ever since Gibson closed their string making facilities in Elgin, Illinois.
     
  17. Vinsanitizer

    Vinsanitizer Forum Support Spec. Double Platinum Supporting Member VIP Member

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    Why? You have to say why or else the thread will collapse.
     
  18. Trumpet Rider

    Trumpet Rider Well-Known Member

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    I'm telin ya, DR HiBeams. If you don't try them you are missing out. Warm but bright, stout but bendy. I've tried most of the strings suggested and I keep coming back to the DRs. The DR Pure Blues are nice, too, but the HiBeams are rocking strings.
     
  19. turfdoc

    turfdoc New Member

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    I highly recommend Fender voodoo child 10-38.
     
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  20. ricksdisconnected

    ricksdisconnected Well-Known Member

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    i use cat gut strings.
     

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