Neck Repairs

axe4me

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I think guitars with neck repairs can be a good find if the price is right.

I did an even up trade of a 1975 Fender Telecaster ($500.00 initial buy) for a "player" 1968 Gibson ES 335.

I wouldn't necessarily do this trade but it involved a Gibson 335.

The guy I dealt with showed me his Fender Telecaster and, IMO, looked like the cracked desert floor.

Acquired taste.

Another word out of the traders mouth, "this is a $7k guitar:rolleyes:", and I would have walked.

If he would see my peach 1969 ES 335, he'd know better.

My '69...........


1969gibsones335tdc.jpg


Nice guy but delusional.

The '68..............

1968gibsones335tdc.jpg
1968gibson335detailc.jpg
1968gibson335detailf.jpg
1968gibson335detaila.jpg

A sign of changes is that there's a volute and no serial # on the back of the headstock.

I replace the metal Grover tuning pegs with plastic Gibson Kluson single ring "tulip" pegs.

I know, 2 ring Kluson pegs are correct............they're a fortune.

My luthier tells me the repair is strong.

I've gigged with the guitar and it played well.

I used my Knaggs Severn Tier 2 as a back up.

My bassist told me that the Knaggs was better sounding.:jam:

Your opinion on headstock repairs or repair changes on a guitar...............
 
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El Gringo

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We have spoken about this not long ago and I am glad yours is a good one . In general for me is to much of a risk as you really never know how good/solid the repair is . For instance what if you gently ding the headstock ? thus making the repair maybe worse , and causing more of a potential warp or the fingerboard lifting or the neck bowing . I know I am sounding doom and gloom , but when your dropping coin $ it is just too risky for my blood . Yes , there are fine ones and even exceptional ones , like the Peter Green Burst that now resides with Kirk Hammett , formerly with Gary Moore , who got it after Peter Green . If it was way back in the 90's or 80's or 70's you could get a replacement neck from Gibson which you still can today but it will be costly as they are more prickly about this type of issue in the present term . Tough call . Yours look aged and finish checked and the repair is pretty clean and not noticeable . To me yours looks like the exception to the rule as you can't see the scar and that's a great thing !
 

axe4me

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I think this Gibson ES 335 may have been re-necked somewhere in the past.

I don't see any clear visible seem for a headstock repair.

The headstock does not have a serial # on the back.

There is a volute and this wasn't done till late 1969.

The body has an orange label indicating that it's a 1968 model.

IMO, it's still a player and not a stock guitar.

Here's the guitar as I originally traded.

It has mettle Grover tuners that I changed to plastic Klusons.

1968gibsones335tdc.jpg
1968gibson335detaild.jpg
1968gibson335detailg.jpg
1968gibson335detailf.jpg

Like I said, it's a player.

The trader's $7k value is pure BS.

 
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Pave Dog

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If it really bothers you Gibson is now doing full repairs and resprays, like Historic Makeovers does. At least that way if you ever want to sell there will be Gibson paperwork. I have seen the repairs done by HM including a broken headstock and it was invisible.
 

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