Marshall vs Hughes and kettner vs mesa boogie

Discussion in 'Other Amps' started by Dayvin, Sep 3, 2020.

  1. Dayvin

    Dayvin New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    6
    hey guys been looking into investing in a new amp and have narrowed it down to either a mesa boogie mark v, a Marshall jvm 410h and a Hughes and kettner triamp mk3... i know its a far fetched topic especially with Hughes and kettner being more uncommon but if anyone has any experience with either of these amps any help would be appreciated i like the classic Marshall tones for obvious reasons but i heard mesa boogie has a sweet fat clean channel and that Hughes and kettner has more marshall tones compared to the mesa boogie the biggest thing i want in a amp right now is versatility if anyone could give any info on either of these amps itd be greatly appreciated that being said im posting on a Marshall thread so i expect to hear more about Marshall but if anyone has any other advice on the other amps thats a big bonus... thanx guys
     
  2. Bogmonster

    Bogmonster Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2014
    Messages:
    146
    Likes Received:
    200
    I can only comment on the JVM (as you said, this being a Marshall forum :D) but it's a very very versatile amp and will do pretty much everything from chimey cleans to full on metal. Can be controlled with MIDI too and sounds great at low and high volumes. Feels great to play too.

    I've only ever played a small Tubemeister (I think that was the model) H&K amp. It was nice but sounded kind of sterile to me. But I've heard a few people get great sounds from them. So take my opinion with a pinch of salt.

    I've never played a Mesa but they do have a particular sound that you either like or not. I personally prefer a Marshall sound. To my ear, it has a bit more bite. Whereas a Mesa seems to roar a bit (in a good way) and is smoother and maybe a little scooped. I believe that's the American sound. Again, I've never played one.

    But the JVM is a beast. Love mine!
     
  3. ampeq

    ampeq Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2017
    Messages:
    1,595
    Likes Received:
    1,626
    Take a look at the Mesa TC100 head if you want a really good versatile amp, it will also get you closer to Marshall sounds. (Much better than the Mark's.) The JVM to me is just not a good Marshall amp. I had one, 410h, and hated it. It was so noisy when I got it I thought it was broke and had them send me another one. The #2 ch. was very good, the #1 / clean was just ok, and the #3 & 4 I didn't like at all which seems to be the biggest complaint with those amps. Some folks love them, you may be one, just not me. They are a pain in the ass to move around if your playing out a lot also. I find them much more like the DSL ser. amp's, to modern sounding for me. The H&K amp's are really more for heavy metal than anything else, at least that is where they shine. They are great for easy quick grab-n-go stuff and the 40w heads do crank. I just never bonded with them, they don't seem to have the "feel" I'm after. They are an amp you really need to play at home for a day to figure out if they are for you or not. I guess out of the 3 amp's I would go with the TC100, it really is one hell of an amp. I had both the TC50 combo and the TC100 head and the TC100 is the way to go. I'v also owned the Mark V combo, although an incredible amp it really lends itself better to studio / recording rather than playing out. It's pretty complicated and can be overwhelming. The TC100 is much easier to get great sounds out of and has much more of the rock theme and closer to Marshall tones. Good luck!
     
  4. Marshall Boogie

    Marshall Boogie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2020
    Messages:
    309
    Likes Received:
    386
    Location:
    Watertown, NY USA
    The Mark V is an awesome amp......BUT.....it is a monster to get used to. I have always considered myself to be fairly fidgety and always tweaking my amps and pedals and processors to get different sounds.....but this amp is a whole other level. You get the different output levels (10,45,90 watt, which all bring in different characteristics of the power section)...9 basic ampo types between the three channels and three modes per channel (each mode is literally like a completely different amp, with all that comes of that)..then the whole tube/silicon diode rectification.....then variac.....then the whole overblown nature of the channels(I find that dropping my volume to 1/2 and setting the channels to operate there makes a whole world of difference....then using volume bumps to get into lead territory....it is as if this amp is set up for leads at full input volume and rhythms at half input volume....really versatile....really hard to get used to).....I have almost sold this amp three times since buying it a year and a half ago.....and every time I get near it....I figure something else out and go....wow....what an awesome amp......most versatile and probably the most difficult to wrap your head around....do not buy one on a whim...know what you are buying or you will regret it. Marshall is Marshall....nowhere near the tweak ability of the other two but will do what they say (everything from clean to crunch and metal) easily.....I have no experience with the H&K but have universally heard sterile and disappointing from others. I have heard people get Marshall sounds...especially plexi sounds....out of the Mesa....but I have not gotten mine to do that yet (I think they do it with el-34's and I have not experimented with them much as yet)....it is such a versatile amp I have spent years getting where I am now with it......I will say Marshall is not an easy tone to find in the Mark v....it is there,,,,but some tones are harder to find(although after learning how to get a sound out of it it becomes easy to get it back....if you write things down....it is that complicated at times.)
     
    Mitchell Pearrow likes this.
  5. The Dose of Harmony

    The Dose of Harmony Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2014
    Messages:
    826
    Likes Received:
    1,010
    Ok Boy!!
    You ask well you have it.

    I own two of those amps

    Mark V very complex amp , not the marshall sound at all very hard to dial and expensive but the clean channel its perfect in all its modes , fat clean mode its amazing for me i at the moment bought it because i love it!
    Perfect tone!
    the other channels are a pain in the ass to dial a fucking nightmare!
    But you can get bad ass tones!
    Its a versatille amp!!

    Jvm its a good amp maybe a a little more versatile amp , but not the best marshall tones but not bad either has midi!
     
    Mitchell Pearrow likes this.
  6. MarcOfWar

    MarcOfWar Member

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2016
    Messages:
    84
    Likes Received:
    89
    I have heard e recording comparison of a TC100 vs JCM800 and they sounded nothing alike. The mesa will always be darker and low mid. Mark V is a beast. More for tight metal but can get fat rectifier like. There is a lot more than metal in this head though. As for the huges and ketner, i remember seing Rush playing it. So that must mean something. Personnaly, i own a Mesa roadking 2 and i have been trying to make it sound like a marshall for years. Even though i came close, it will never be a marshall. The only reason i dontnown a marshall right now is because im still waiting for that high quality, versatile amp that will make me go for it. I heard a lot of good thing about the JVM but also a lot of bad thing. So i guess im waiting for a better quality, slightly strip down version of the jvm, that will sound like a jcm 800 perfectly, but with more gain if i feel like adding some.
     
    Mitchell Pearrow likes this.
  7. The Dose of Harmony

    The Dose of Harmony Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2014
    Messages:
    826
    Likes Received:
    1,010
    You can get very close to the JCM 800 with the JVM already third channel its base on the JCM 800 and if you put a pedal you might get even closer.
    Problems with JVM its the noise and that it does no take pedals that well like other Marshalls.

    Man I love my Mesa MV but its a Hard amp to dial but once you get forget it!
     
    Mitchell Pearrow likes this.
  8. Dayvin

    Dayvin New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    6
    thanks bro that info helps alot
     
  9. Dayvin

    Dayvin New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    6
    wow soo hard to pick between these amps lol ive neber really looked into the jcm amps as much as i should so from my understanding they have more of a real marshall tone is that it??
     
    Mitchell Pearrow likes this.
  10. Dayvin

    Dayvin New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 3, 2020
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    6
    thank u all for your help btw didnt think id get these kind of responses it all helps alot
     
    Mitchell Pearrow likes this.
  11. headcrash

    headcrash Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2015
    Messages:
    178
    Likes Received:
    253
    Although I haven't played neither one, I'd say the three "want to be" different to each other. It's just what I interpret from looking at the schematics/circuits (I only have the schematic of the Triamp 1, which as far as I know is the base/core of the successors).

    The TriAmp - since Hughes&Kettner doesn't have such a amp legacy - wants to combine 6 of the most sought after amplifier circuits into one amp. Plus a truckload of additional features.

    The JVM combines most of the best Marshall (Master Volume based) Mid Gain and (modded) Higain Sounds/circuits of Marshall History, plus tries to emulate cranked and non-cranked Plexi Sounds, plus adds a Fender-esque Clean on its first channel.

    The Mesa Mark V builds on its Mark Series-history, and also has a Fender-like Clean channel. The gain channel on Mark series amps' tone stacks differ from what most of us might be used to. Its placed early in the circuit in between the gain stages. Turning up bass will not add overall bass content (almost), but will feed bass contetnt into the gain stages, meaning it can get flubby depending on the pickups and the gain level. Same for the middle and treble dials. To add bass, middle or treble content to your sound (as you might be used to), you might use the graphiq EQ . I consider this concept to be the reason why many have a hard time dialing good sounds with Mark series Boogies. However, I have never played one, since I am leaning more towards MArshall-y sounds (we're on a Marshall forum here right? :dude:).
     
    Mitchell Pearrow likes this.
  12. Mitchell Pearrow

    Mitchell Pearrow Well-Known Member VIP Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2018
    Messages:
    13,029
    Likes Received:
    24,306
    Location:
    Moreno Valley CA
    :welcome: To the forum
    Good luck on your amp quest.
    Lots of cool and knowledgeable people here on the forum.
    Cheers
    Mitch
     
    MonstersOfTheMidway likes this.
  13. tallcoolone

    tallcoolone Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2011
    Messages:
    1,232
    Likes Received:
    1,970
    Damn, couldn’t disagree more here. I took a TC in a trade and tried like hell to love it but just zero dynamics. Next to any Marshall it just sounded so compressed—no presence (cut) at all. I liked the MV—lots of range in that amp, but yeah not so much with the TC. Here is a Mark V clip—I think it sounds pretty Marshally? I couldn’t get this out of the TC.

     
    MonstersOfTheMidway likes this.
  14. 67mike

    67mike Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2015
    Messages:
    783
    Likes Received:
    888
    My vote would be grab a 2555x.

    Throw in an od pedal and you have a swiss army knife that sounds fsntastic.
     
  15. MonstersOfTheMidway

    MonstersOfTheMidway Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    5,256
    Likes Received:
    3,083
    I agree :agreed:.

    When I first tried the TC50 and then the TC100, I felt it sounded pretty good on it's own. But it was only after using it with a band that I felt it sounded a bit stiff response (especially on the low end_. I tried dialing that quality out, and then just trying for another tone altogether, but no matter what, I couldn't get away from that stiff response. I used different multi-soak settings; different switch settings for "tight", "norm", and "drive" on different channels, just couldn't shake it loose. I tried different speakers later as well as a different guitar, but same sh*t. Perhaps if it had more EQ options like the Mark V,the TC50 and TC100 would be a little more flexible on tone...or perhaps I was just unlucky with a couple of malfunctioning amps.
     
  16. MonstersOfTheMidway

    MonstersOfTheMidway Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    5,256
    Likes Received:
    3,083
    First, try to play these three in person if you can (I know it's hard with the current times). It might make the decision easier if you can sit and play through these in person.

    All three have lots of versatility, which is something you mentioned in your initial post.

    The Mark V has lots of great features that make it a make it a versatile amp, but the Mark V's most significant power aspect is the tone shaping controls. The standard tremble, mid, and bass have a pretty broad range, but the built-in 5-band graphic equalizer and it's various switches like "Mark 1", "Mark 2C+", pentode/triode, diode/tube options make tone shaping it's more versatile aspect. For me, the most versatile Mesa-Boogie is not the Mark V (which is a very good amp) but the discontinued Road King 2.

    The JVM410H covers a very broad range of tones with it's four channels/three modes per channel feature (channel OD1/orange mode is a favorite among many JVM4 owners). The gain controls on all four channel are incredibly responsive with just a slight turn of the dial resulting in large amounts of overdrive/distortion/dirt. The supplied six-button footswitch furthers the JVM410H reputation as a versatile amp. The footswitch can be used in a mix and match of two modes of operation: switch store mode and preset mode. Adding to the switching versatility is MIDI connectivity, which elevates switching to a level that integrates other MIDI-capable gear (such as some multi-effect and some rack effects systems). Silent recording, one effects loop, one line level loop, dual master volume, reverb for each channel, and eq strip for each channel give players lots of options to tweak.

    I liked the features of the Hughes and kettner triamp mk3, but the sound characteristics just didn't leave me happy. The clean tone sounded a little thin and trebly to my ears; the most aggressive overdrive/distortion/dirty channel (3A and 3B) was seemingly reminiscent mix of two old amp I used to use: Randall RG100 and Peavey 6505+ (that's not to say the RG100 or the 6505+ are shitty amps, but in the H&K it had a peculiar sound that kinda reminded me of these two amps). The features are fantastic and worth of versatile amp design: built-in Red Box emulted out, MIDI, power amp that can use a variety of tube types, built-in noise gate, and built-in boost are some of the excellent features on board and housed in a rugged head box.

    If I had to place them in order:
    1st: JVM410H
    2nd: Mesa-Boogie Mark V
    3rd: H&K Triamp MK3

    Again, I recommend you play through these three amp in person so that you can make the best decision for yourself.

    Good luck with your decision.
     
    tallcoolone likes this.
  17. ampeq

    ampeq Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2017
    Messages:
    1,595
    Likes Received:
    1,626
    Yep, a lot of folks like the Mark ser. and for good reason. I liked the TC100 better for several reasons but both are very good. I had no problem getting JCM800 sounds from either amp, but that’s about it. If you mainly want British tones you should not be looking at a Mesa in the first place. They are not made for that type of tone, nor does Marshall do any Mesa stuff. That is why it’s nice to have one of each. One thing to note about the Mark V is how complicated it can be, you have to set stuff on the front and rear panels and you better write it down when you find something you like. Sweetwater told me that is the number one “returned” amp they sell. I still think it’s one of the best studio amps going. The RA100 is another one I love from Mesa.
    Something I should have said about the JVM410h, if you do like these find a good used one. They have a shitty resale value and are only worth $1000 used. Let someone else take the hit.
     

Share This Page