I can't play anything other than Les Pauls

Discussion in 'Guitars' started by Frozenintime, Oct 15, 2015.

  1. Frozenintime

    Frozenintime New Member

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    I play a variety of Rock and Funk. And absolutely love the control of dual volume, dual tone, and quick 3 way toggle. Just love this setup.

    I did a small show over the weekend with a Strat. It drove me nuts! I use the volume and tone knobs a lot - because I don't have a sound guy who is balancing y levels. Us poor people have to control the volume ourselves.

    Also, the neck to me feels much better on a Les Paul than a PRS, or Strat, or Ernie Balls (God! I have no idea how people play these).

    I guess I like a flat fretboard. Most guitars have a curved one. Gibsons don't tend to. love it!

    Like I said, it's my preference. Weird because I grew up with Strats. My first guitar was a Squire strat. In my 20s I moved to a Les Paul and never looked back.

    Do you guys have a similar preference or can you play (or better yet, enjoy playing) on any guitar?
     
  2. ricksconnected

    ricksconnected Well-Known Member

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    any style of guitar. i try not to limit myself.
    im not a huge fan of the quality of LP's
    these days, well for about 10 yrs. guality
    has taken a serious nose dive. so i stay
    away from them. i do like the epiphone
    guitars.
     
  3. Vinsanitizer

    Vinsanitizer >>> Fridgerator <<< Double Platinum Supporting Member VIP Member

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    Well I like both Les Pauls and Strats, but it depends. Les Pauls are my first choice. I have a '58 and a '59 Reissue and the controls are really great on those guitars - very different from a modern Les Paul. Here's how I use the controls (usually I go with #1):

    1.
    -Set both tone controls to 10.
    -For rhythm, set the bridge and neck volumes to 4 or 5 (maybe a notch more on the bridge for a little more clarity.)
    -For soloing, raise the volume control of either pickup to 10 (depending on which pickup choice you want of course), then return it when done.
    This method is good for switching between rhythm and solo playing, and provides a very full tone while rolling off any sharp highs.

    2. Set the volume controls to 10 and the tone control of the bridge pickup to about 6. Raise or lower the bridge volume control for switching between rhythm and soloing.

    These settings don't work as well with modern Les Pauls because of the pots they use in them. I know nothing about pots and caps and don't get into the science of it. Also, if you watch The Song Remains The Same concert video, you'll see Jimmy Page constantly riding the volume and tone controls. That's how these work - they're very dynamic and clean up nicely. Add the use of the pickup selector and you'll have an unlimited range of tones from quieter clean-ish to full-on solo.

    As for Strats and Tele's? Very different. And each guitar is different. I don't like that they lose treble or fullness (depending) when you roll down the volume control, and the tone pots cut way too much top end off. I just want a tone control to roll off some of that single coil or metallic edge, not darken the whole thing up. But I've had a few that do work well. Again, I don't know the science, but I replaced the bridge single coil in one Strat with a humbucker while leaving the stock 250K pot in there, and the volume control on that one seemed to work well with my JCM 800's when I had them.
     
  4. MarshallDog

    MarshallDog Well-Known Member

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    I can play just about any once I get warmed up to it although I do prefer LPS's.
     
  5. diesect20022000

    diesect20022000 In Memorandum VIP Member

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    I can suck on any guitar but I have spec requirements for what I will own. 12 in rad minimum for starters.
     
  6. ricksconnected

    ricksconnected Well-Known Member

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    why 12 in.
     
  7. blues_n_cues

    blues_n_cues Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    I can play Strats & "strats" but I really prefer a fat 50's LP neck.
     
  8. Bigmuff

    Bigmuff Well-Known Member

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    Larger radius = flatter fretboard = easier to play fast, and long bends don't 'fret out' as easily.

    small radius = more curved fretboard = easier for chordwork (supposedly... I find them uncomfortable for anything).

    Gibsons are typically 12", which is average. Older Fenders are often 7.5. Shred-style guitars are 14" or more.
     
  9. rmlevasseur

    rmlevasseur Well-Known Member

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    I am a guitar whore. Like em all different. If it is set up properly I'll play it.
     
  10. dsmcl77

    dsmcl77 Member

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    I quite like the 7.5in radius and V neck on my Strat, but LP's put a smile on my face every time...
     
  11. ricksconnected

    ricksconnected Well-Known Member

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    good job!

    seriously guys, dont limit yourself to one style of guitar. if you do your missing out on 50% of the fun. i cant imagine just having one style of guitar in my collection. would be very boring indeed.
     
  12. cornhusker86

    cornhusker86 Well-Known Member

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    Here Here :yesway:
     
  13. dptone5

    dptone5 Well-Known Member

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    I prefer Strats and super-Strats over LP's. I find them uncomfortable, unbalanced, don't stay in tune, no tremolo, etc...

    I own one, but it's not my thing. It has a classic sound that I do love.
     
  14. chiliphil1

    chiliphil1 Well-Known Member

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    I love reading words from a great musician, a pro (I assume you are) it's amazing what happens when someone has a comprehensive understanding of their gear. Kids in my generation (I used to be like them) they want 1 button for clean, 1 button for distortion, in truth I do use my JVM this way but it seems like the ART of playing the guitar is gone, it's too easy to press a button but man when you plug into a real amp and use the guitar for your tone it is a religious experience and it makes you so much better of a player, modern amps have spoiled people.

    BTW, I know how much you LOVE the 15 Gibsons I will mention how great it is to have the coil taps, phase reverse, and the bypass in addition to the volume and tone controls, it really opens up a lot of doors. Now, I find that I do not use the tone controls at all but I definitely ride the volumes, it's like having 10 amps behind you, any tone you want, right there.

    I couldn't agree more! When it comes to my guitars I have a favorite and a least favorite but I still love being able to pick out which tone or which feel I want at the time, it's really enjoyable, much like selecting the clothes you feel like wearing that day, T shirt for comfort or a suit for a night out??
     
  15. johnfv

    johnfv Well-Known Member

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    Fat neck Strat? Warmoth 59 Roundback profile - I gots several...
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  16. Rocktane

    Rocktane Well-Known Member

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    Flat fretboards & skinny necks for me. Although I have been playing an Explorer all day which is really neither. :shrug:
     
  17. Vinsanitizer

    Vinsanitizer >>> Fridgerator <<< Double Platinum Supporting Member VIP Member

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    Thanks for the compliment. Glad to know anyone reads my legit posts and not just my silly @ss stuff. Always a pleasure to talk shop about guitar sounds. I do understand quite well the notion of wanting everything available at the click of 1 button. It was a journey I was on for nearly 20 years to achieve instantaneous clean, rhythm and lead sounds. I thought my dream came true with the TSL100 (3 channels), but that was a fallacy. Then I thought it came true again with the JVM410H (4 channels and more), again a disappointment for me. Those are great amps, and the ideas were great but the execution always fell short at the end of the day. I'd tried configuring complex switching systems for years, but they never worked well enough, were too expensive and impractically cumbersome. Then I thought the Mesa/Boogie Triaxis with the graduated pedal configuration was a phenomenal idea, but when it came out the whole preamp/poweramp system it was way too expensive for me, and seemed like overkill for getting 3 simple sounds. My last attempts were throughout 2006 to 2009, trying to work with modeling floorboards by Boss, Line 6 and DigiTech, and I could do some amazing and complex configurations with the pedal controls to graduate gain, volume, have effects jump in at maybe 60% pedal travel, etc. But in the end I was completely dissatisfied with the tone and the amount of time it took to experiment with them.

    These days I'm happy to say that I've realized (albeit, the hard way), that the best approach is definitely the simplest and had already been accomplished by old schoolers like Page, Clapton, Beck and many others. I used to watch The Song Remains The Same in awe of how Page could get all that tonal variation just with the volume and tone controls and he was always fiddling with them. I was frustrated because my Les Pauls and JCM 800's weren't even coming close to what those guys were getting tone-wise. It didn't completely happen for me util I began using the Marshall SL5 and a couple 50's Reissue Les Pauls: the combination of that amp, low gain, loud volume, and the pickups, pots and caps in those guitars was a revelation to me that somehow I eventually arrived at by accident mostly. I later bought a Fender Princeton and was getting the same results even with a solid state distortion box.

    So all that is to say, in summary, that I've learned the hard way that the simplest methods really are the best. Today it's a combination of good guitar controls, low preamp gain, and more output breakup using smaller amps. Those really are the basic magic ingredients for rich, dynamic, soulful tone.

    Last note: I would never knock someone's guitar preference. If you have a '15 Gibson and you like it, your opinion actually negates mine. I'm glad to hear you like yours, and I think the split coil option is very cool.
     
  18. dreyn77

    dreyn77 Well-Known Member

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    Vin the same method is also used for the modern gibson pickup. you just use the modern amp with them.
    they work the same way, make a very similar sound. they're acuritely made by gisbon too.

    cause seymour's pickups work on the low input on your 800, you might notice that they don't clean up as good with the vol/tone controls.
    seymour's general pickups are made for guitars which don't have 2 volume controls. (each pickup).
    they're made for 1 volume control guitars.

    cause each pickup selection has powerful custom tone, you can't mix them for the sounds which gibson pickups offer you.

    so the playing techniques you can use on the gibson, can't be used with the SD's regular model pickups. antiquities are special pickups.

    you can't just slightly fatten the bridge pickup of a seymour duncan pickup set, by adding some neck pickup on volume 2.

    so when you play the JCM2000 amp and you have a seymour custom pickup set, you can't solo with dual pickups on at the same time, and have a fatter bridge pickup tone (both pickups on at the same time, bridge on max power and neck pickup on 2)

    the gibson offers lots of suttle variations in the pickups sounds.

    SD offers BIG tone differences like no other pickup brands offer you.

    I'm just compareing 2 brands products here. add in dimarzio and you've got a whole nother way of making sounds, and they're very unique as well.

    no other pickup will do what a gibson does, no other pickup will have the massive sounds a SD pickup has and no other pickup will have the custom twist sounds a dimarzio pickup has.

    and that's just talking about 1 type of pickup model.


    I can play with the same type of sound tone as George thoughorgood, but with the eric clapton strat.
    george has a BIG single note with a full tone and hiss, but the claption guitar pickup makes 2 notes of the same type, but they're smaller in range when compared to georges original sound. same tone on the neck pickup and all.

    BUT george's pickups influence the player to play that way.
    the clapton pickups with the double smaller notes sound doesn't influence the player to play in that style.

    so don't forget how the sound makes you play the music. it's important feature which most people are influenced by but seldom talk about.
     
  19. dreyn77

    dreyn77 Well-Known Member

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    flat fingerboards are better for chords. it's been that way for 500 years.
    don't try and change it now.

    some idiot came by and made a curved fingerboard instead of the successful perfectly flat fingerboard of the last 500 years.
     
  20. ricksconnected

    ricksconnected Well-Known Member

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    good post vin. the SL5 is the slash combo right?
     

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