Hum..........

Sg-ocaster

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No Im not pondering the universe here LOL.
But anyways Ive been living in a new apartment for 3mo now and there is an ungodly obnoxious hum in the wiring here. Not sure if its the wiring or the neighbors apliances or what.
It happenes weather Im using my strat P90s or buckers and on every amp. The amp is silent when input is unplugged or if guitars volume is rolled all the way down but as soon as you ramp up the guitars volume is obnoxious.
I dont record at home or do any serious rehearsing at home, just learning material and home practice but the hum is allmost as loud as the guitar itself and its difficult to even play here.
Is there a cheap solution to rid or atleast tame the hum im getting.
 

houseofrock

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It could be a breaker in your panel. The contactor will hum when it's worn out. It isn't making good contact and needs to be replaced. Turn each one off, one at a time, then back on until you find the culprit. Easy fix. Buy a new one and replace.
It could also be the AC disconnect. Either at the air handler or the the condenser.
You can also get a cheap circuit tester that plugs into the wall outlet to check wiring.
 
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Sg-ocaster

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Yea there are no florescent lights here and I went around shutting lights off trying to find it. If you sit and listen to the HUM for awhile it changes pitch occasionally for like 5 seconds like something is kicking on then back off.
As far as breakers Ill have to figure out which panel is ours. There are 4 apartments here.
But im thinking its something in either the upstairs or side apartment next to us causing RF and I know about sending RF to ground with shielding....but............the tinfoil is starting to look good LOL I was actually thinking of shielding a large cardboard box with foil and grounding it and placing my amp in it for practice.....seriously LMAO
Im pretty versed on groundloop hums and such as I did live sound for a long time, but this is driving me crazy.
 
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neikeel

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What amp?
Presume different high quality leads tried?
 

Pete Farrington

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I was actually thinking of shielding a large cardboard box with foil and grounding it and placing my amp in it for practice.
From the description, the amp is fine, rather it’s the guitar that needs shielding. But whilst kitchen foil might help with electrical fields, ferrous screening (ideally the very expensive mumetal used for mic transformer cans) would be needed in the case of magnetic fields.
 

Chris-in-LA

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The low voltage lighting at my parent’s house wreaked havoc with my AC30. The hum was incredibly loud as I turned up my guitar.
 

Sg-ocaster

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What amp?
Presume different high quality leads tried?
DSL, Dean Markley CD60, Park G25 practice amp and Epiphone 10W practice amp ALL the same......Guitars Gibson LP Jr(yea single coils) SG faded 490 pups HSS strats.
Yea new leads.
All guitars and tube amps work fine gigging and at rehearsal space.
Im thinking im screwed here as I have no control over stuff in the other apartments and cant really start swapping breakers out in the landlords panel(unless Im sneaky).
 

mickeydg5

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You cannot really do anything about the building except moove.

Maybe try a nice voltage regulator that conditions/filters the voltage. I like Furman.
 

Sg-ocaster

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You cannot really do anything about the building except moove.

Maybe try a nice voltage regulator that conditions/filters the voltage. I like Furman.
Yea I may try a furman was also thinking Im pretty sure they make a small plug/box that plugs into the wall and the AC cord plugs in that Hum-X or something like that I think it was called.
 

houseofrock

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Pete Farrington

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Maybe try a nice voltage regulator that conditions/filters the voltage.
If the noise is due to environmental electric or magnetic fields, it isn't being carried into the amp via the mains.
Note that the amp it self doesn't make the noise, the noise only manifests when the guitar pickup is brought into play.

Try a mains conditioner before actually buying it, or buy on approval / the understanding that it can be returned for a full refund if it doesn't help.

If it's a ground loop issue this would help. A Furman has been mentioned.
https://www.guitarcenter.com/Morley/Hum-Exterminator-1500000332190.gc?rNtt=hum&index=1
In my view, those things are downright unsafe.
The sales claim that it is 'absolutely safe' is absolutely untrue.
They put back to back silicon diodes in series with the equipment's safety ground circuit. That's a really bad idea, if there's a serious electrical fault the diodes could open and leave the equipment metalwork - and anything connected to it, including the guitar / strings - possibly live up at 120V :shock:
Products that do that are not allowed to be sold in many regions, it beggars belief how consumer safety regs in North America deem them ok :hmm:

Whatever, their purpose is to break ground loops between 2 items of electrical equipment that each have a safety ground connection, eg an amp and a mains powered fx unit connected to it.
Yet @Sg-ocaster describes a noise that only requires a guitar and amp for it to manifest.

So a Hum X / Hum Exterminator wouldn't seem to be of any benefit in regard of noise, and would be extremely detrimental in regard of electrical safety.

The key test is to check whether using a battery powered amp (set up for a similar level of gain as your normal rig) eliminates the noise, or is just as noisy.
If it's just as noisy, as I fear it may be, then I don't see how power conditioners etc could possibly help?
 

mickeydg5

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If the noise is due to environmental electric or magnetic fields, it isn't being carried into the amp via the mains.
Note that the amp it self doesn't make the noise, the noise only manifests when the guitar pickup is brought into play.

Try a mains conditioner before actually buying it, or buy on approval / the understanding that it can be returned for a full refund if it doesn't help.


In my view, those things are downright unsafe.
The sales claim that it is 'absolutely safe' is absolutely untrue.
They put back to back silicon diodes in series with the equipment's safety ground circuit. That's a really bad idea, if there's a serious electrical fault the diodes could open and leave the equipment metalwork - and anything connected to it, including the guitar / strings - possibly live up at 120V :shock:
Products that do that are not allowed to be sold in many regions, it beggars belief how consumer safety regs in North America deem them ok :hmm:

Whatever, their purpose is to break ground loops between 2 items of electrical equipment that each have a safety ground connection, eg an amp and a mains powered fx unit connected to it.
Yet @Sg-ocaster describes a noise that only requires a guitar and amp for it to manifest.

So a Hum X / Hum Exterminator wouldn't seem to be of any benefit in regard of noise, and would be extremely detrimental in regard of electrical safety.

The key test is to check whether using a battery powered amp (set up for a similar level of gain as your normal rig) eliminates the noise, or is just as noisy.
If it's just as noisy, as I fear it may be, then I don't see how power conditioners etc could possibly help?
Yes, it was said it only manifest when turning the guitar up.
In that case a voltage regulator/conditioner may not be required.

Maybe the apartment is close to some electrical facility or transmission facility and the guitar/instrument cable is picking up the interference.

It leads me back to an earlier suggestion, mmoove. I do not think he may be able to get rid of the nuisance.
 

mickeydg5

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No Im not pondering the universe here LOL.
But anyways Ive been living in a new apartment for 3mo now and there is an ungodly obnoxious hum in the wiring here. Not sure if its the wiring or the neighbors apliances or what.
It happenes weather Im using my strat P90s or buckers and on every amp. The amp is silent when input is unplugged or if guitars volume is rolled all the way down but as soon as you ramp up the guitars volume is obnoxious.
I dont record at home or do any serious rehearsing at home, just learning material and home practice but the hum is allmost as loud as the guitar itself and its difficult to even play here.
Is there a cheap solution to rid or atleast tame the hum im getting.
Does the hum go away when you actually play or is it heard mixed into the signal as well?
If so, how does the hum level differ when playing?
 

Sg-ocaster

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OH yea you hear it while you play......its actually very dificult to tune by ear with the hum. Well the hum is loud but not as loud as the cranked up guitar so your hear it between notes but it doesnt overpower full on notes but takes over on the decay. Its annoying.
Ill have to see if I can dig up a battery operated amp to try. A freind had a Dano Honeytone but that was YEARS ago....prolly gone by now.
 

Spanngitter

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Does the hum change if you move around with your guitar? P90s are really prone to pickup anything which is around, including wanted and unwanted signals...
 

Kutt

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I have little to add except some extreme ideas such as powering your amp off a battery backup system of some sort to see if that helps, or playing acoustic! You could also abandon the amp thing and try playing through your computer or other digital device that probably isn't as susceptible to whatever is torturing your amps.
 


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