How can I create a 100% dustless environment?

mulletmule

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I am sick and tired of dusting all of my gear and other shet.

I have literally HAD it up to HERE (about 5', 10" upward from floor level) going around wasting silly air cans that don't work very well, and using gheyass feather dusters.

Also, I am fed up with vacuuming. (I don't know if you knew that already.)

Is there anything I can do short of completely encapsulating my Green Room™ in air-tight plastic and using high-powered, high-volume oxygen filtration? Is there a practical and cost-effective device I can get that sucks out all the dust?
I cover my amps in my studio with fabric every time I’m done! I buy it long enough to cover 4 half stacks on one wall and a hold stack on another. I also have a couple smaller ones for combos.

I keep my guitars in the cases and store them on shelves I built under the stairs.

Works great!
 

lespaul339

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I just dust my gear every once in a while. I hear ya though, would be nice to keep everything clean and dust free without the work!
 

PelliX

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I cover my amps in my studio with fabric every time I’m done! I buy it long enough to cover 4 half stacks on one wall and a hold stack on another. I also have a couple smaller ones for combos.

I keep my guitars in the cases and store them on shelves I built under the stairs.

Works great!

Nothing against it, just curious; why? Is it just the "annoyance" of having dusty gear? Allergy or respiratory stuff?
 

Vinsanitizer

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It's all about positive VS. negative airflow (pressure) and the filtration that it takes to properly manage a space.

What you need is air supply (not the band) being pushed into the room thru a filter, probably with HEPA or better filtration. (External air to your studio is the the enemy). Clothing that sheds, furry pets and crappy vacuum cleaners are also a problem.

Regardless, you have to decide which way you are moving the air. Either you draw the fresh air from outside of the structure (thru a filter) or you draw it from inside the structure (thru a filter). Regardless of how you supply the air to the studio, the air must exhaust to make the system work. Stealing air from inside the structure (home, etc.) can lead to other problems like cold spots, warm spots, drafts, etc. The climate in a home could potentially be sucked in thru the studio and wasted to the outside. Bringing cold or warm air in thru the studio is a entirely different problem.

Do some research on Positive VS. Negative air flow and then decide which way to go. A basic home HVAC with a blower fan is typically positive, but not always. If your system has a "squirrel cage" blower, it's likely positive pressure. If you have hot water (mini boiler) baseboard or electric heat or similar non-blower, air movement is not really an issue, but contaminated air is basically everywhere. That's why we call it dust and yes, it sucks.

You can re-engineer your studio, seal the leaks and invest in serious noiseless Climate Control or maybe just look for a stand-alone filtration unit that sits in the opposite corner from your high dollar music gear. Most of us would just buy a standalone unit and hope for the best.

Stand alone units also make noise and even an SM57 mic will pick up the sound. Turn it off when recording and don't forget to change the filter. A dirty filter defeats the purpose. If you purchase a unit, also purchase extras filters. By the time you need to purchase new filters, they will probably be discontinued. Just saying.

Good luck !
Hmm. :hmm: That's interesting; basically you just install a large enough vent near the floor which holds a removeable (HEPA) filter, on one side of the room, then from there run some silver circular duct tubing up and over the ceiling tiles into a unidirectional fan, and have it blow back into the room through another vent in the ceiling on the other side of the room. You'd also be able to monitor how it's going by checking the filters to see how dirty they are getting.

I suppose I could go the quick & easy route and go with a standalone, but it's difficult to imagine they're effective beyond a few feet, and don't make a lot of noise trying to circulate the air. I wish I didn't buy a standone/portable AC unit for the room either, because those things put almost as much heat back into the room via the outlet tube, as they do cooling the room. Advice to the unknowing: avoid portable AC cooling units because they are VERY inefficient.
 

Vinsanitizer

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Nothing against it, just curious; why? Is it just the "annoyance" of having dusty gear? Allergy or respiratory stuff?
In my case, every piece of gear I own, as well as many other things I own, get the "baby diaper" treatment. It's just how I've always been. I want it looking exactly the way it did when I took it out of the box, decades later. However, make no mistake: there is gear that I have that has plenty of grime and road-wear, and those things I do not feather dust.

A beat-up Marshall 4x12 can look cool; it tells a story. But gear that's just loaded with dust and neglected reminds me of people who don't shower regularly.
 

Dogs of Doom

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I've got the solution...

Put up a sign:

no-park copy.jpg

& the little dust particles will simply obey the rules of the law that you put up...

Problem solved! :)...

of course, you'll have to make up some house rules/law indicating that there will be no dust allowed & that there will be consequences if they don't obey...

:wave:
 

mulletmule

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Nothing against it, just curious; why? Is it just the "annoyance" of having dusty gear? Allergy or respiratory stuff?
Just to keep them from getting trashed. I’m pretty anal about my gear. Dust is what makes a grill cloth look old. I just take care of everything so that if I ever wanted to sell it it’s in good shape!
 

Dogs of Doom

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Just to keep them from getting trashed. I’m pretty anal about my gear. Dust is what makes a grill cloth look old. I just take care of everything so that if I ever wanted to sell it it’s in good shape!
when I was working in a contamination containment area, the whole project was about dust particles & minimizing them (not my job, but those doing it alongside my job). What they did, was moisture in the air. If you have thick, balmy air, dust can not float around.

Of course, this would most likely be too much humidity for wood instruments, or, even a house, if you have wood floors, etc. Probably not good on drywall either. Makes for a good recipe to attract termites also...

There really is no solution to dust. Some areas are less dusty than others, due to less wind, &/or less travel by people in the environment. Humidity plays a part as well.

There will become a point, that living dustless is a miserable existence. Only you can decide where that line is...
 

JamminJeff

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Hmm. :hmm: That's interesting; basically you just install a large enough vent near the floor which holds a removeable (HEPA) filter, on one side of the room, then from there run some silver circular duct tubing up and over the ceiling tiles into a unidirectional fan, and have it blow back into the room through another vent in the ceiling on the other side of the room. You'd also be able to monitor how it's going by checking the filters to see how dirty they are getting.

I suppose I could go the quick & easy route and go with a standalone, but it's difficult to imagine they're effective beyond a few feet, and don't make a lot of noise trying to circulate the air. I wish I didn't buy a standone/portable AC unit for the room either, because those things put almost as much heat back into the room via the outlet tube, as they do cooling the room. Advice to the unknowing: avoid portable AC cooling units because they are VERY inefficient.
I think what your describing is a what they call a ductless system, which really isn't ductless. They are basically tubes that supply and return air to and from a space via a remote VAV box with a blower and a filter. The VAV box typically has at least a heating coil and often a cooling coil leading outside to a condenser unit. (The return air is exhausted to the exterior). That's the simple version and a one room unit is probably expensive. If you know an HVAC tech, they might give you the low down on the good, the bad and the ugly.

If you are describing some type or recirculation air system with a filter at either end (or both) it still won't prevent external air from leaking into the space. This happens naturally and from being drawn in to a negative pressure room. BTW, a negative pressure room should always be exhausted to an outside wall, but you still need fresh air coming in, filtered of course.

Engineers who install massive HVAC systems invest hours and days with making the air flow in the proper direction. One room has the same challenge.

As a side note, if a stand alone unit doesn't fit the budget or space, there are disposable "dust absorbers" on the market that supposedly attract dust via charged particles, ions or some other nerdy technology. There are some plug in units that supposedly work better. I've never used or seen either, but I have heard the eggheads talk about them.

Whatever you decide to do, sealing up windows, cracks, false ceilings, etc. will go along way to slowing down dust accumulation.

Also, my suggestion about a good vacuum cleaner with excellent filtration will go a long way to solving problems and shave the dog, wife, etc. People and pets shed, including skin.

As a test, vacuum or even just sweep a hard floor, then immediately turn out the lights. (You need a fairly dark room). Then take a good flashlight and turn it on in the same room. The dust in the air will probably blow your mind, unless you have a super clean house in a super clean area.

Maybe just buy a case of Deoxit.

If you invite a bass player over to record and his name is Pig Pen, the problem isn't filtration.
 
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PelliX

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I have a proactive system against dust. I use damp/wet lungs and hairs in my nose where the dust gets stuck as I slowly de-oxygenize the ambient air. It might not be as efficient as other systems, but it comes quite naturally once you get used to it...
 

dimbulb

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when you've worked out all the ventilation and filtration mechanics, don't forget the last step:

YOU

shower and rub a washcloth and loofa vigorously all over to scrub off all the dead skin from your body. also shampoo your scalp vigorously with your fingers and rinse thoroughly

you're the source of the dust -- don't take any more of it into your music room than you have to
 

Trelwheen

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When I plugged all the windows in my studio for acoustic purposes I noticed a drastic reduction in the need to whip out the Swiffer.

Plug yer winders: Cut 3/4" plywood to fit inside the window frame. Push the plywood all the way in until it touches the window. Screw or nail in place, then use liquid nails or similar to caulk around the edges. Install rock wool on top of the plywood. Cut another piece of 3/4" plywood to fit inside the window frame. Push the plywood in until it touches the rock wool. Screw or nail in place and caulk in the same way you did the first piece. It will now be very quiet in your studio and dust will not find its way through the window frames.

Keep the door or doors to your studio closed. Don't let pets in your studio.

Do not bring people home who live under bridges, and if you do, don't let them sleep in the studio.

Do not whip your children or spouse in the studio. This can raise a hell of a lot of dust
 

Vinsanitizer

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I cover my amps in my studio with fabric every time I’m done! I buy it long enough to cover 4 half stacks on one wall and a hold stack on another. I also have a couple smaller ones for combos.

I keep my guitars in the cases and store them on shelves I built under the stairs.

Works great!
Pics or all your guitars are Hello Kitty, and your loudest map is 10 watts (solid state).
 
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Weapons Man

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One day when I was in High School history class, some smart ass pissed off the teacher. The class got real quiet and the teacher looked at the smart ass and said, "Under your chair you will find a little colony of dust mites...they are very tiny but I assure you they are there....in fact, they are so small that if you were to suddenly get up from your chair and leave the class, the downward rush of atmospheric pressure would crush the poor dust mite colony out of existence....and I can assure you that those little dust mites are the only ones who really care whether you continue to sit in that chair or not."
 

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