First cab build - Finished

PaulHikeS2

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Just finished this today - worked on it over about a week. 1x12" mahogany closed back loaded with a G12H-75 Creamback.

Cab quarter front resize.jpg Cab left quarter resize.jpg

This is a Stewmac kit - 3/4" mahogany Taylor Guitar off-cuts, CNC cut/routed. I wanted to design myself, but my woodcutter brother is a bit unreliable and I don't have the ability/tools to cut 100% square with confidence.

As it is, I had to buy tools and got first time experience in several things: bought a trim router and bits to round over the edges, countersinking screw holes, learned how to use grain filler - used ebony filler and finished with medium walnut Danish Oil. Also learned that a craft/light duty staple gun is useless for grill cloth. Had to pull all the staples and run out to get a proper staple gun.

Made a couple little mistakes. Lower right corner I should have clamped closer to the front - there's a 1/32" gap that shows as a black line from the grain filler. And I did a good job on the outside with the roundover, so I thought I'd do the inside frame and realized as doing it that a round bit can't get onto a 90 degree corner. Glad it was only a 1/8" roundover bit and i was able to file into the corners to mostly take care of it.

Here's a few more pics. I sounds great with my DSL1HR but I'm going to use it with a Vox hybrid head, pictured at the end.

Cab back left quarter resize.jpg Cab back resize.jpg Cab half back resize.jpg Cab no back resize.jpg Cab-Vox resize.jpg
 

BlueX

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That's a nice cab, congrats on your first build! I think it's very pleasing both to build and to own and use stuff I made myself.

Made a couple little mistakes.
The only difference between the beginner and the experienced is that the experienced has already made those mistakes. To me this is part of the fun with building, to learn as you proceed (as long as you don't hurt yourself seriously).
 

paul-e-mann

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Just finished this today - worked on it over about a week. 1x12" mahogany closed back loaded with a G12H-75 Creamback.

View attachment 116262 View attachment 116264

This is a Stewmac kit - 3/4" mahogany Taylor Guitar off-cuts, CNC cut/routed. I wanted to design myself, but my woodcutter brother is a bit unreliable and I don't have the ability/tools to cut 100% square with confidence.

As it is, I had to buy tools and got first time experience in several things: bought a trim router and bits to round over the edges, countersinking screw holes, learned how to use grain filler - used ebony filler and finished with medium walnut Danish Oil. Also learned that a craft/light duty staple gun is useless for grill cloth. Had to pull all the staples and run out to get a proper staple gun.

Made a couple little mistakes. Lower right corner I should have clamped closer to the front - there's a 1/32" gap that shows as a black line from the grain filler. And I did a good job on the outside with the roundover, so I thought I'd do the inside frame and realized as doing it that a round bit can't get onto a 90 degree corner. Glad it was only a 1/8" roundover bit and i was able to file into the corners to mostly take care of it.

Here's a few more pics. I sounds great with my DSL1HR but I'm going to use it with a Vox hybrid head, pictured at the end.

View attachment 116265 View attachment 116266 View attachment 116267 View attachment 116268 View attachment 116269
Are your joints glued and screwed? I dont see any screw holes puddied up or plugged. Ive been using butt joints for decades on cabs, been wanting to try dovetail joints maybe on my next project if there is one. Nice job though! :yesway:
 

PaulHikeS2

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Are your joints glued and screwed? I dont see any screw holes puddied up or plugged. Ive been using butt joints for decades on cabs, been wanting to try dovetail joints maybe on my next project if there is one. Nice job though! :yesway:
It is entirely glued - it was routed with mortise and tenon joints. I don't have a workshop or garage, but I was well setup with a B+D Workmate 425 that my wife gave me. Bought 4 bar clamps for < $20 and I was good to go. Should have bought 6.

I learned a lot about design by doing this, and a cab reclamation project that's in progress. I'm confident that if I come across an interesting 6' board that I could put together a nice cab, with or without screws. I didn't take a lot of pics during construction, but next time I will at least take pre and post picks of each of the major steps. These pics are of the final clamping, before the edges were rounded over. I learned from my mistake on the L-R clamping and have the clamps much closer to the edge so there's no gap in the top to bottom joints.

Cab clamp 2 resized.jpg Cab clamp 1 resized.jpg

And here's a shot of the back where I purposely didn't use grain filler and the top, where I did like everywhere else.

Cab back unfinished.jpg Cab top grain filled resized.jpg

I wanted to see the difference with similar wood. In the final product, the grain filler made the wood more interesting with more depth, but it also tamped down the natural reds of the mahogany a bit.
 

BlueX

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And here's a shot of the back where I purposely didn't use grain filler and the top, where I did like everywhere else.

I wanted to see the difference with similar wood. In the final product, the grain filler made the wood more interesting with more depth, but it also tamped down the natural reds of the mahogany a bit.
I like that you experiment! There is stained/toned grainfiller available, e.g. for mahogany, to keep the look of the wood. Or you can stain/tone the filler yourself. Just make sure the pigment is compatible with the filler, depending if it's water-based or solvent-based.
 

PaulHikeS2

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I like that you experiment! There is stained/toned grainfiller available, e.g. for mahogany, to keep the look of the wood. Or you can stain/tone the filler yourself. Just make sure the pigment is compatible with the filler, depending if it's water-based or solvent-based.
I used ebony - it was recommended by the clerk at Woodcraft for mahogany. Earl's Timbermate Wood Filler. Very thick paste, which I thinned to the consistency of thick syrup and applied with 0000 steel wool, per the same clerks advice. I have a mahogany guitar that I'm putting together that i will use a similar technique, but with a different color filler - curious how that will appear.
 


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