Favorite Recorded Marshalls on a Song or Album (legendary or current)

LoudStroud

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2020
Messages
169
Reaction score
359
What band or guitarist using a Marshall on record made you want one? I searched to see if this had already been discussed but surprisingly could not find a thread, so thought I’d crank it up.

For me there are sooo many, so I’ll start with these…
Mick Ralphs on Mott The Hoople albums, All The Young Dudes and Mott. Prime example songs: One of The Boys (ATYD), All The Way To Memphis (Mott) and Whizz Kid (Mott).

Not only did Mick’s playing and tone make me want a Marshall, but also a Les Paul Junior. There are so many tones I like and appreciate, but this combo is the core of my soul.

Ohhh there are many more, but let me hear yours.
 

1234_thumbwar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 12, 2022
Messages
237
Reaction score
390
Jimi Hendrix live at the LA forum in 1970 is the sound that really made me get into Stratocasters and Marshall amplifiers. Hey Baby (New Rising Sun) is the song that does it most for me

I also liked Mick Ronson’s sound on the the Ziggy Stardust and Spiders from Mars soundtrack album which is just a bunch of live recordings of a Marshall Pig, a Les Paul and a couple pedals

Eric Clapton’s tone on the Beano album with Hideaway still floors me. Then there’s his evolution to a Superlead that sounds superb live with any show in 1968 but the live version of Deserted Cities of the Heart at the Oakland Colosseum does it for me. Also criminally underrated is his sound with Blind Faith live at Hyde Park in ‘69. Means to an End is fantastic

Jimmy Page also made a telecaster sound cool with a Marshall for the b bender sounds on In Through The Out Door and the live shows at Knebworth in ‘79
 

purpleplexi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Feb 14, 2011
Messages
1,844
Reaction score
3,618
So much but these days I'd just to get a tone like the first solo on this.

 

colchar

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 7, 2009
Messages
1,666
Reaction score
1,754
Location
The Great White North
Duane's slide tone here is the greatest guitar tone ever recorded, but Dickey (my favourite guitar player, as demonstrated by my avatar) also played Marshalls and sounded incredible. Duane played 50 watters (take that anyone who claims you need 100 watters to get the real goods from a Marshall!!) and Dickey played 100 watters so that he could stay cleaner at the same volume as Duane.


 
Last edited:

LoudStroud

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 22, 2020
Messages
169
Reaction score
359
Duane's slide tone here is the greatest guitar tone ever recorded, but Dickey (my favourite guitar player, as demonstrated by my avatar) also played Marshalls and sounded incredible. Duane played 50 watters (take that anyone who claims you need 100 watters to get the real good from a Marshall!!) and Dickey played 100 watters so that he could stay cleaner at the same volume as Duane.



Spot on!! Dickey’s tone is the primo example of a clean singing 100W Super Lead and contrasted/ complimented Duane’s Bass 50 tone so well. I actually preferred Dickey’s tone.
 

BlueX

Well-Known Member
Joined
May 5, 2020
Messages
927
Reaction score
2,223
Location
Sweden
Maybe old fashioned, but among all great recordings I put this slightly above some of the others


I love this story, and hope it's true (copied from Wikipedia):
"Dowd had worked with many of the biggest jazz and rhythm and blues musicians in the 1950s and 1960s. However, Cream was his first exposure to extreme volume levels. The group arrived at Atlantic with their concert setup of multiple Marshall amplifiers (each 100 watts). Dowd was surprised by the amount of equipment accompanying the trio: "They recorded at ear-shattering level ... Everyone I'd worked with before was using Fender Deluxes [about 20 watts] or Twins [about 80 watts]—six- and seven-piece bands that didn't play as loud as this three piece did."

Of course the guitar matters:
"For his guitar solo, Clapton used a sound known as the "woman tone", which is described as "smooth, dark, singing, sustaining", by author Mitch Gallagher. The actual guitar that Clapton used has been identified as a 1964 Gibson SG, known as "the Fool". It is one of the best-known examples of the woman tone and quotes the melody from the perennial pop standard "Blue Moon"."
 

Latest posts



Top