Epoxy Over Solder Joints

Discussion in 'The Workbench' started by aberry9475, Nov 25, 2020.

  1. aberry9475

    aberry9475 Active Member

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    So hear me out boys. I'm digging around in the shop and find this nice wire, PTFE insulation I think and pretty thick. Like 10-12 gauge, and stranded. Methinks to myself, hmm, this might make a nice heavy duty speaker cable. So I chuck it up in a drill and make a twisted pair, go through the motions of sizing up some sleeving and a plug housing. Looking pretty snazzy.

    Thing is, it is stiff. Very stiff. But you can kind of bend it to hold a shape which isn't bad.

    So I'm wondering, even after I crimp, solder, and heatshrink, it could possibly still use a little more strain relief. So I thought, well..could literally just take a couple dabs of epoxy like JB weld or similar and run that over the connection to secure it to the terminal. Make it so you'd literally have to break the plug before you break the connections, which would definitely not be easy.

    What say ye people of Marshall Forum of this idea?
     
  2. FourT6and2

    FourT6and2 Well-Known Member

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    I say go for it. Why not.

    But... 10-12 awg is pretty thick lol. I use 14awg twisted pair I get in bulk.

    30 feet of 14 AWG dual-conductor Van Damme cable for $25

    [​IMG]
     
  3. william vogel

    william vogel Well-Known Member

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    Are you making cable for inside the cabinet or a cable with 1/4 inch tip sleeve plugs on both ends.
     
  4. RLW59

    RLW59 Well-Known Member

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    I've got a pair of '80s Pro-Co Lifelines 18' instrument cables with epoxy filled plugs. (Two twisted wires with a floating grounded shield.) I sometimes prefer 10' cables and the Lifelines have outlived bunches of standard good quality cables. They're likely to outlive me.
     
  5. aberry9475

    aberry9475 Active Member

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    Yeah it is pretty thick, but actually, the insulation is pretty thin so the wires are not as big as you might think. I'll post a couple pics of a mockup just to see if it'll work. It is indeed 10 gauge I've found. Twisted pair, then a layer of gorilla sleeve, then some techflex, terminated into standard .400" G&H. Could be pretty sweet.

    1.jpg
    2.jpg
     
  6. junk notes

    junk notes Well-Known Member

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    Anything around 20 gauge is what Marshall used. It was not 16ga. or thicker. Jim uses 16ga. on his Scumbacks. Does not hear a difference going to a thicker wire than that, but can with lighter gauge wire than 16ga. The bass, and low mids are better defined on the 16 gauge wire, and less defined on the thinner wire.
     
  7. dragonvalve

    dragonvalve Well-Known Member

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    I would be concerned about what happens when you need to resolder something. Would need to clean all the epoxy off before getting a proper solder surface.

    You didn't mention how the wire sounds compared to others.
     
  8. Edgar Frog

    Edgar Frog Well-Known Member

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    I wouldn't use it, no need IMHO. If you need something to make you feel a little confident though, a really tight zip-tie between the solder points and the plug relief crimp would work great and be easier to service but even that is overkill IMO. That's if it will fit under the sleeve, never tried it myself. I've made thousands of cables and never had to use anything outside the strain crimp and heat shrink.
     
    anitoli, trax1139 and dragonvalve like this.
  9. Gene Ballzz

    Gene Ballzz Well-Known Member

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    In stead of epoxy, I use hot glue. It fills all gaps and doesn't actually stick to anything except plastic, like shrink wrap. If dis assembly is ever needed, it leaves the metal clean.
    Juat My $.02,
    Gene
     

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