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electronic quality

Discussion in 'Other Amps' started by J E H, Apr 20, 2021.

  1. J E H

    J E H Active Member

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    Time for honesty!!!
    I have owned MANY brands of music equipment.
    There are 2 features thatmatter to me.
    Sound good?
    Reliability?

    Some Marshalls sound good.
    Many are not reliable for long.
    Some are. Many are not. They cost a lot.
    They started building cheap shit to stay in business. Totally understandable. Works for a while.
    CHEAP electronics. Too complicated. Cheap mother boards - right next to HOT tubes.

    I have been at this for decades.
    Marshall amps do not cut the mustard for me any more.
     
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  2. J E H

    J E H Active Member

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    OK. I'm sorry. I have owned 4 Marshall. One is pretty good. The other 3 were SHIT.
    LOTS of MONEY. LOTS of MONEY You are right 25% success rate is just really great.!!!!!!
    Fool me 4 times shame on you. Fool me 5X/ shame on me. Permanent ex-Marshall musician.
     
  3. fitz288

    fitz288 Well, Known Member Silver Supporting Member

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    So, what's your new go-to amp brand for quality electronic reliability at comparable prices?
     
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  4. ricksdisconnected

    ricksdisconnected Well-Known Member

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    ok tell us the back story.
     
  5. lespaul339

    lespaul339 Well-Known Member

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    That's why I've resorted to building my own amps. I can pick my parts and components, make one of way better quality, point to point turret board instead of PCB's and it's cheaper than buying a cheaper made Marshall.
     
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  6. ampeq

    ampeq Well-Known Member

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    Unfortunately I can understand that, love the sound but not so big on the product. For me Marshall quit building amps around the 80’s. When I found Ceriatone, and especially the Chupacabra, I found the sound I’v been longing for in a well made amp and at a great price.
     
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  7. Dogs of Doom

    Dogs of Doom Moderator Staff Member

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    a quick review shows you have/had:

    Haze 40
    2005 TSL100
    2007 TSL100
    '84 2204

    Sounds like the cap's in the 1984 amp have been showing signs of needing changed, but you've neglected to change them. The TSL was a bad amp, all around. Buying 2 was a mistake. The Haze, was an import amp. I'm not that familiar w/ them, but probably cheap...

    If the 2204 is junk, I'll buy it for $500 off you... :)...

    If capacitors have an expected lifespan of 15 years, sounds like the caps are 20+ years overdue for change. That's not the fault of the amp, or Marshall. It's normal/regular maintenance...

    Ironically, you do seem to boast about that amp being a trooper, that you dragged it all over, etc., but, now, due to neglect, you're throwing it under the bus? :shrug:
     
  8. What?

    What? Well-Known Member

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    It's a balance for me of sound, serviceability, and price. I would like all my gear to be serviceable, but sometimes that isn't practical. For anything costing more than a couple of hundred bucks, I definitely want it to be serviceable, so these days I avoid buying any more gear that isn't.
     
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  9. ampeq

    ampeq Well-Known Member

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    In my eyes you have really only owned 1 “Marshall”, the TSL’s and Haze... not so much. If you like the 2204 sound I would say have a good tech go through the whole thing and bring it back to spec. Check all the caps, spray all the pots, test the tubes and give her a once over. You could probably run another 10 years with it easy. If you get another vintage amp, no matter who makes it, you may end up doing the same thing. Maybe a mod or 2 as well, now would be the time. All tube amps need service at some point and if it’s a good amp it’s a no brainer. You don’t run your car tires 250,000 miles do ya?
     
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  10. Sapient

    Sapient   Silver Supporting Member Platinum Supporting Member

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    Yes
    I've owned many. I've never had a Marshall fail.
     
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  11. Matthews Guitars

    Matthews Guitars Well-Known Member

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    My JMP era Marshalls have so far never failed me aside from a weak/noisy tube or two.

    I don't think you can beat a JMP era Marshall for reliability. And just as reliable are Fender amps made from, let's say the mid 60s to the early 80s. All assuming they've had preventative maintenance and occasional routine servicing done for them, of course.
     
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  12. Wildeman

    Wildeman Well-Known Member

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    Esteban has never let me down..........never
     
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  13. J E H

    J E H Active Member

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    thanks for responding -- actually is is an 84 JCM800 50watt with 2 12's. It is back. Sounds very cool. The TSL100 head is 'out of commission' -- back to that later. There was only one. AND, the HAZE (never mind....). There is also this little orange marshall - 1 tube, 1 speaker -- sounds really good. My main is Fender Super Sonic 22 watt box amp. No money going into the Marshalls at this time. I am cool with Marshall. Lots of their stuff is really grand.
     
  14. Torren61

    Torren61 Active Member

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    Sounds like you're drinking and frustrated.
     
  15. Matthews Guitars

    Matthews Guitars Well-Known Member

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    I've been seriously tempted to grab one of those little Esteban G10 amps out of a thrift store and take its logo off and put that logo on a plexi clone.

    I'd just think that's FUNNY. And the more outrageous the amp sounds, the better the joke works.
     
  16. ricksdisconnected

    ricksdisconnected Well-Known Member

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    anything?
     
  17. Jethro Rocker

    Jethro Rocker Well-Known Member Silver Supporting Member

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    I have a TSL. Never a lick of trouble.
    1987 Jubilee. No issues caps still good.
    Newer stuff? Mini Jubilee? Sc20H?
    JVM?
    No issues with the JVm either it is a 2012.
    Don't care where they are made or how. Everything electronic can have issues. Even with PCBs, a tube amplifier is not a cheap no name LCD TV set. Now that is cheap electronics.
    Marshall works for me.
    All the more for me.
     
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  18. Matthews Guitars

    Matthews Guitars Well-Known Member

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    Today I took in a 1965 Fender Pro Reverb (original, not a reissue) for service. It was low on volume and making broken speaker noises when you tried to turn it up, and it wasn't the speakers.

    It didn't take me long to find the problem once I had the chassis out of the cabinet.

    It was just a loose ground wire in the tone stack. It was soldered to the brass backer plate with a puddle of solder, and had worked its way loose from 56 years of use and vibration.

    With the ground to the tone stack lost, the amp would go into an ultrasonic oscillation (at 134 KHz!) for a few microseconds every time the input signal got large enough. The oscillation would die out after about 40 cycles of oscillating, to return the next time the input signal reached a threshold voltage.

    Aside from having its filter capacitors replaced, and a few coupling capacitors from past service, that 56 year old Fender amp was in its original state, and is a very pristine example.

    That is a fine example of a reliable, well built amp. I can't say anything bad about a ground wire that took 56 years to work its way loose.

    And yet, there are more secure ways to make a ground termination than to directly solder a wire into a puddle of solder on a brass plate. A crimped solder lug, screwed to the chassis, would have been even better.
     
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  19. Torren61

    Torren61 Active Member

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    Would you rather work on a PCB amp circuit or a hand wired, point-to-point circuit?
     
  20. Matthews Guitars

    Matthews Guitars Well-Known Member

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    It doesn't make a bit of difference to me. I'm an expert even on surface mount devices in the smallest package sizes. I've worked on so much equipment that is much smaller
    and much more densely packed than ANY guitar amp ever made that it makes even the most untidy and cluttered amp look like a walk in the park.

    For a time I worked as an engineering specialist for an avionics company. I built test systems, fixtures, support circuits, etc. while doing that. When I submitted my first assigned
    soldering assembly project for inspection, the inspector said "This is only test fixturing. You don't have to work to Class 1 standards." My response was "That's just my normal quality
    standard. I'd have to work harder to build it sloppy enough to make Class 2 or 3 standards." So...I'm delivering workmanship as a matter of routine that most assemblers have to work
    long and hard to match.

    You can't scare me with a PC board. But sometimes amp designers do scary things involving PC boards.
     

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