Does a cone repair affect sound?

Discussion in 'Let's Talk Vintage' started by guitarman555, Mar 2, 2021.

  1. guitarman555

    guitarman555 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2020
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1
    I am concidering a vintage greenback speaker with cone repair, it is at the outside part of the cone, not at the innerpart, where ridges are. In this case, should be withou affect on sound? Thanks for opinions
     
  2. 2L man

    2L man Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2020
    Messages:
    77
    Likes Received:
    33
    If cone has rip because of aging I think it will rip soon where repair ends because there forms a mechanical stress point when heavier patch does not move same rate. If it is mechanical damage it depends what kind it is. For sound it can even have a positive effect!
     
    guitarman555 likes this.
  3. guitarman555

    guitarman555 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2020
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1
     
  4. guitarman555

    guitarman555 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2020
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1
    See the repaired crack if you think it can affect the sound, thanks!
     
  5. guitarman555

    guitarman555 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2020
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1
    Now the pictures should finally appear for members, can you see them?
     
  6. shakti

    shakti Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 14, 2016
    Messages:
    233
    Likes Received:
    210
    Any repair or modification to the cone will affect the sound to some extent. How much is almost impossible to say. Two vintage T1221s never sound exactly the same anyway, so to hear a difference between a minty speaker and a repaired one, it’s really hard to know where the differences you’re hearing are coming from.

    On first sight that repair looks nicely done, even if it was a pretty bad rip to begin with. I have several speakers with repairs, some minor, some bigger repairs like that one. They all sound fine to me. Was that repair done by a guy in the Czech Republic by any chance? I got some with repairs that look a lot like that, and they were all fine.
     
    guitarman555 likes this.
  7. Seanxk

    Seanxk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 14, 2018
    Messages:
    649
    Likes Received:
    526
    Not sure about the sound but from the picture it looks that the outer cone is resting in a very forward position, they usually sit much deeper. It probably has had a hard life and possibly its rigidity is not what it used to be, bumpy roads with worn suspension.

    Edit, has the rear spider been re glued and is pushing cone forward? otherwise I think the above, it could of course be camera angles.
     
    guitarman555 likes this.
  8. StingRay85

    StingRay85 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2019
    Messages:
    1,225
    Likes Received:
    893
    I agree. This also happens when stored in damp conditions for decades. Also the dust cap looks replaced? I hope OP didn't pay too much for it, the only thing that is guaranteed to be worth something, the plastic magnet cover, isn't even included.
     
    guitarman555 likes this.
  9. BygoneTones

    BygoneTones Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2013
    Messages:
    1,385
    Likes Received:
    978
    The dustcap does not look original on that speaker either. I would pass. Wait for one in good original condition to turn up for sale.
     
    mAx___ and guitarman555 like this.
  10. guitarman555

    guitarman555 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2020
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1
    Any other opinion? My plan is not to hurry. I have a Marshall PA 20w and need a cab with a good speaker. I wanna buy greenback and install it into a Marshall 1912 1x12 cabinet should suit right?
     
  11. guitarman555

    guitarman555 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2020
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1
    They say only: No coil rubbing or loose spider. The speaker has been checked over by a speaker repair shop and lightly touched up on the back of the speaker to ensure it works proper for years to come.
     
  12. guitarman555

    guitarman555 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2020
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1
    Sorry for too many questions at one place. I just wanna buy a 1x12 cab for Marshall and install vintage greengack into that, most affordable and often available seems to be 1912. Are the other any better? Here is the list of option:
    MODEL 1912 - 150W, 1-12 in. extension cab designed for use with the JCM900 1-12 in. combos, mfg. 1989-1998.

    MODEL 1931A/1931B - 75W, 1-12 in. G12T75 speaker, angled cabinet, designed for use with the Model 3310, mfg. 1989-1991.

    MODEL 1933 - 65W, 1-12 in.G12 65 speakers, extension cabinet designed for use with the JCM-800 Model 4010 and

    Model 4210 1-12 in. combos, mfg. 1984-89.
     
    Last edited: Mar 4, 2021
  13. guitarman555

    guitarman555 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2020
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1
    Any opinions please?
     
  14. Matthews Guitars

    Matthews Guitars Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2019
    Messages:
    3,571
    Likes Received:
    5,269
    The more minimal the repair is, the better. Low mass, not affecting stiffness properties, is ideal.

    I once saw a 12" subwoofer that somebody had "repaired" by applying several layers of those heavy cotton "shop towels" to in the damaged area,
    which was almost half the cone, and saturating the area in glue. Oh, it was stiff, and the speaker worked, but clearly that was not a great way to repair a speaker.

    I have a technique for speaker cone repairs that has been highly successful. Here's how I do it.

    I had two speakers from a Fender Super Twin Reverb that had had holes eaten in their surrounds by roaches. No hole was even as big as a quarter inch,
    but the holes were clean and would have definitely affected the sound of the speakers.

    Supplies list:
    Fabric adhesive glue (similar to Elmer's white glue)
    Gauze bandage, taken apart to separate its pad layer from its woven suppport layer. Toss out the pad layer, keep the weave layer.
    Ordinary untreated (non scented, non lotioned) tissue paper. Kleenex facial tissue or similar.

    A little bit of black dye in alcohol
    Small scissors
    Small artist's paintbrush
    Tweezers

    Cut a patch for the hole out of the facial tissue and also out of the gauze weave layer. One at a time, dip both in the dye,
    pull them out, let them dry. (Or you could just use a black sharpie.)


    Apply a small amount of glue to the area to be patched on the speaker.

    Drop the dyed black gauze weave layer on the glue.

    Use the tip of the paintbrush to poke and prod the patch into position, smooth it out, and make it conform
    to the surface. This is particularly good if the repair is in the pleats of the accordion folds in the surround.

    Apply a little more glue for the facial tissue patch. Be sure to use enough that the whole patch gets glued down,
    but no more than that. Push it into place with the paintbrush as well.

    Repeat the process on the other side of the cone.

    The gauze weave layer provides the structural strength, the two tissue layers saturated in glue become the new
    paper layer in the cone.

    Properly done, the repair probably weighs LESS than any missing paper in the cone's damaged area.

    For a larger repair, I'd cannibalize paper cone material out of a junk speaker that has a generally similar cone material,
    and add the step of installing a carefully cut repair patch in the cone between the two repair patches.
     
    guitarman555 and CraigP like this.
  15. CraigP

    CraigP Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2016
    Messages:
    864
    Likes Received:
    1,057
  16. CraigP

    CraigP Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2016
    Messages:
    864
    Likes Received:
    1,057
     
    guitarman555 likes this.
  17. guitarman555

    guitarman555 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2020
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1
    What cab would you recommend? I wanna buy a vintage greenback G12 H or G12 M, and put it in to one of 1x12 Marshall cabs. Or another cab?
    MODEL 1912 - 150W, 1-12 in. extension cab designed for use with the JCM900 1-12 in. combos, mfg. 1989-1998.

    MODEL 1931A/1931B - 75W, 1-12 in. G12T75 speaker, angled cabinet, designed for use with the Model 3310, mfg. 1989-1991.

    MODEL 1933 - 65W, 1-12 in.G12 65 speakers, extension cabinet designed for use with the JCM-800 Model 4010 and

    Model 4210 1-12 in. combos, mfg. 1984-89.
     
  18. guitarman555

    guitarman555 Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2020
    Messages:
    32
    Likes Received:
    1
    Any cabs comparison or recommendation?
     

Share This Page