Broken wah wah pedal

Discussion in 'The Tone Zone' started by Blaoskaak, Oct 20, 2020.

  1. Blaoskaak

    Blaoskaak Active Member

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    Hi everyone!

    I bought a used wah wah pedal, but it doesn't work. Of is a Crybaby gcb95.

    I place it in front of my amp. When i place it Between en turn in the amp, i get no sound at all. Only a loud hum. It does not make a diffrence if the pedal is on or off.
    Also have to push the pedal all way down to hit the on/off switch.

    I am not using it with a battery. I have it removed and use a 9v cable.

    Who can help me. I can solder if it must.

    Thanks!
     
  2. junk notes

    junk notes Well-Known Member

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    Is you power supply 200mA equivalent or better? Do you have access to a reverse polarity cable?
     
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  3. Benighted

    Benighted Member

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  4. DaDoc

    DaDoc Well-Known Member

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    Sounds like maybe your power supply or power cable may not be compatible with the Wah.

    Unplug the power supply, put in a battery, fire it up and see what happens..If the problem is still there it's likely the Wah itself.

    When I first scored my Voodoo Labs AC power supply I had a similar problem with trying to use some of my older pedals with it. A lot of stompboxes aren't compatible with that particular unit and you may have something similar going on.
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2020
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  5. Gunner64

    Gunner64 Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    And Make sure your p.s. is compatible polarity wise with the wah.
     
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  6. zachman

    zachman Well-Known Member

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    Replace the On/Off switch. Not an uncommon issue
    :cheers:
     
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  7. Blaoskaak

    Blaoskaak Active Member

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    Thank you very much for your reactions!

    It works on battery, do I need a different 9v cable for this pedal as for my other pedals?
    I also don't like the sound with the wah. the sound is distorted and goes much softer when the pedal is up (on) . When the pedal is all the way down (off????) it looks like the pedal is always on too. Have no idea if it can be turned off?

    I have already read on the internet that there are different mods, to make the pedal better. Anyone familiar with it?

    I would love to hear your opinions.
     
  8. zachman

    zachman Well-Known Member

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    re: mods: Just put a boss tuner, or other buffered pedal after the wah, and you'll be fine.

    Make sure you 'click' the switch to activate/de-active the wah sternly. If it's sort of stuck between off/on it'll sound like rats sucked on it. Push it with your finger on/off (click/click) to ensure solid a press

    Also, Make sure you have the correct adapter, as the housing on what may look to be a correct voltage/power spec adaptor-- may still be a bit too thick or too loose to fit snuggly and properly, in the wah's adaptor jack.

    Not sure if you're using other pedals simultaneously or not, but if you are-- some things to consider:

    A wah is a filter. Most guys tend to plug their guitar straight into their wah, then other pedals then their amp's input. I put the wah further down the chain-- after OD's, Distortion, phaser, flanger, etc., so it has a more harmonically rich signal to filter; try experimenting. You'll discover a preference.

    If it still sounds skinny and lame after testing the switch, while using a battery-- instead of the power supply. Change the switch 1st. Could be the pot, but try that 1st.

    If you or someone else plugged in, for example an AC power adaptor instead of the correct DC power adaptor, you could have fried the pedal. I've seen guys do that. Hopefully not

    Good Luck
     
    Last edited: Oct 21, 2020
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  9. Wildeman

    Wildeman Well-Known Member

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    This! I got one in the boneyard right now because of it.
     
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  10. Blaoskaak

    Blaoskaak Active Member

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    I am not familiar with a buffered pedal. Does it make sure the volume doesn't drop off when I use the wah? I also bought a true bypass mod with led light. This will be a big improvement.

    I have more pedals.
    - mooer reecho
    - guitarslinger rb1011
    - wah wah

    I also found out that I am using the wrong 9v cables. I have an ac 9v for my pedals and I need dc 9v. Didn't know that. Luckily i do now!

    Thank you all for your help!
     
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  11. zachman

    zachman Well-Known Member

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    Good thing You didn't use the 9vAC adaptors or you'd have fried the pedals. Glad I mentioned it. Be Careful. The details are important.

    If you have a bunch of pedals connected together and the added cable length to the amp, can make it sound like there's a blanket over your sound, a buffer will fix that like a Boss TU3 tuner or ANY Boss pedal last in the chain back to the amp.

    From Custom Audio Electronics' website re: Buffers and True Bypass

    What are buffers and how are they used?
    Buffers are extremely important in a multi-component system. They are often misunderstood and often get a bad rap by those who are uninformed. In a CAE system, a buffer is a unity gain (input level equals output level) impedance converting circuit. It essentially protects your high impedance guitar output (or any other high impedance source, such as an amps' effects loop send) from being loaded down by the input it is connected to. In effect, it converts high impedance to low, which means subsequent stages are then driven by a low impedance source (the buffer's output). High impedance sources such as your guitar's output (assuming you have passive pickups) has very little current drive capability and it's signal is subject to a harsh environment once it leaves the guitar. You already know the adverse affect a long cable has on your tone. Same thing happens if you pass your signal through a bunch of effects pedals. Even if they have "true bypass" (an ugly, over-used term), each one will suck a little more of your signal along with the cables and connectors, mainly due to capacitive loading of your high impedance guitar signal. The end result is a muffled weak signal that lacks clarity. But once your high impedance guitar signal hits a properly designed buffer with a high input impedance, the buffer takes over, and uses its higher current capability (remember, its an active circuit that requires a power supply) to drive all subsequent stages, thus preserving your instrument's tone. This brings us to buffer quality. Buffers come in all types of designs, from discrete transistor, op-amp, to esoteric tube designs. All have their own unique sonic stamp. At CAE we use the op-amp approach. It has served us well for years, is low noise, and is extremely transparent to our ears. Buffers often get blamed for causing an overly bright sound, but we feel if its designed properly, any perceived "brightness" is because now the guitar is not being loaded down by subsequent stages!

    Buffers can cause problems, too. There are some effects devices that don't like to see the low output impedance of a buffer. These are typically discrete transistor designed fuzz circuits (such as the Dallas Arbiter Fuzz Face). They react better to the high impedance output of the guitar. In fact, the guitar output, cable and input stage of the Fuzz Face complete a circuit that is highly dependent of those 3 components to work correctly. Fuzz Faces clean up nicely when you roll back the guitar volume control... not so if a buffer is between the guitar and Fuzz Face input. So if you have a pedal board with a Fuzz Face on it , put it first! Other pedals may react the same way. Experiment to see what works best for you. Keep in mind all active pedals (such as Boss, Ibanez, etc...) act as buffers and will impart their own sonic stamp even when bypassed. This is what started the whole "true bypass" (ugh! that term again) craze. See? Too much of a good thing can be "bad". Which brings us to how we utilize buffers in CAE custom switchers. We only use buffers where absolutely necessary. Typically, in a pedal based system we will not buffer until after the first 4-5 loops, which is usually just prior to sending the signal down to the pedal board (via a long cable run, hence the need to buffer) to hit the wah/volume pedals. Any more than 4 or 5 loops, and the guitar signal may be affected by capacitive loading. So the first few loops is where you would put any impedance sensitive effects. This also means your guitar will go through fuzz, overdrive or distortion pedals BEFORE the wah. We prefer this order because the wah then has a more harmonically rich signal to filter. Try it yourself. Of course, if a specific order is required, we will do everything we can to make it happen. Buffers are also necessary to drive isolation transformers, since the relatively low primary impedance of the transformers may be detrimental to whatever circuit is feeding it. This is also why amp splitter circuits must be buffered. You can't drive multiple amps with a relatively high impedance source. So there usually is a buffer somewhere in the output stage of your custom switcher. That's usually it. 2 places minimum. There may be more active stages depending on your system requirements.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2020
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  12. Blaoskaak

    Blaoskaak Active Member

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  13. zachman

    zachman Well-Known Member

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  14. Blaoskaak

    Blaoskaak Active Member

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    I did some research about the tuners, but i am a bit confused. It is a device that helps tuning my guitar. How can that help for the tone of my guitar?

    I have a cable from my amp to the first pedal that is 6.5ft then i have 3 pedals.

    The rb1011 pedal
    Mooer reecho
    Wah pedal.
    I recently bought joyo jf12 octave

    From my last pedal to guitar i use a 16.5ft cable.
    Total with the patch cables is about 25ft. Do i need a buffered pedal or tuner pedal then?

    EDIT: i just bought a boss tuner tu3. Going to pick it up this afternoon.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2020
  15. yladrd61

    yladrd61 Well-Known Member

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    I find most of the modern dunlop "Crybaby","Vox""Clyde McCoy" wahs all sound like (#@*&), there are some great wah mod kits out there that can get close to the sound of the original Italian "Jen" wahs.
     
  16. Blaoskaak

    Blaoskaak Active Member

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    Tanks for your input. I like the wah from stevie ray vaughan.

    When i don't like my wah after the mods i'll buy a better one. I got this one very cheap.
     
  17. yladrd61

    yladrd61 Well-Known Member

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    When you are ready check out a guy called Joe Gagan "kalena_5" on ebay, he has the best selection of drop in mod kits for the Dunlop wahs.
     
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  18. yladrd61

    yladrd61 Well-Known Member

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    Of course just as a bit of irony the Fuzz Face is a true bypass effect. Sometimes a buffer can be useful if you want to run a wah in front of a Fuzz Face and still have a useable sweep.
     
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  19. zachman

    zachman Well-Known Member

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    I mentioned a tuner, though all Boss pedals are buffered pedals-- so any Boss pedal would do really, but it's a relatively cheap solution, and I figured a tuner is useful in and of itself, and solved the buffer issue, so mentioned it 1st because it was an easier solution than to mod your wah, likely adding a buffer would be among the mods you would add anyway.

    I would suggest running guitar, echo, wah, Boost, tuner, amp Input. If your amp has a series fx loop, I'd run the echo in the loop. Then it would be guitar, wah, boost, tuner, amp input w/ the echo in the loop send/return.

    Let me know how it goes.

    :cheers:
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2020
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  20. zachman

    zachman Well-Known Member

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    How and why would a buffer affect the sweep of the wah, regardless of if run in front of (or after) a Dallas fuzz with the wah being 1st?

    Running a buffer before or after the wah but in front of the Dallas fuzz would eliminate the high impedance reactance between the passive guitar pickups and the Dallas fuzz, so the fuzz wouldn't clean up when you roll back the volume on the guitar-- like they do, but running a buffer before or after the wah, and before or after the Dallas fuzz-- it wouldn't and shouldn't affect the sweep of the wah at all, as I understand your description. What am I missing?
     
    Last edited: Oct 25, 2020
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