Bad Experiences With Vintage Gibson Neck Flex - Considering New Gibson/epiphone

Discussion in 'Guitars' started by Robert Herndon Project, Sep 19, 2016.

  1. 30watt

    30watt Well-Known Member

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    I struggle to see a 59 going out of tune easily, given that it probably came with 12s.....
     
  2. BowerR64

    BowerR64 Well-Known Member

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    Ive had a few guitars that would have this issue and i went up in gauge sometimes a gauge and a half (the custom strings that have heavy bottom and light top) and then the neck requires a little more tightening of the truss rod that made it more stable.

    Some times i think necks just go soft from humidity and then they are just lost and will never come around.

    It would suck though if a high end guitar did that.

    How do you know for sure its the neck though? do you measure the action? Ive had issues with other things that cause tuning stability issues though.
     
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  3. Robert Herndon Project

    Robert Herndon Project Well-Known Member

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    Bower - its been a while now. I sold my two Gibson's in 1998, but a luthier friend told me that the Gibson's have a lot of flex in the neck...not the joint, but in how the neck attached to the body. I play really aggressively and I could seeming pull those guitars sharp just in moving around with them. I used .011's on them both.

    I bought a brand new Gibson SG (Standard?) in 2002 - the last one I owned - but it was a tuning nightmare too. Locking Grovers did nothing to help its tendency to go out of tune. I ended up selling it.

    Funny...I was watching a band the other night....the lead player had a Gibby Les Paul....and he was literally tuning after every song.

    With my Schecter, once the strings stretch, that's it....it doesn't change.

    I will say that I do really like the tone of those old PAF's....
     
  4. Robert Herndon Project

    Robert Herndon Project Well-Known Member

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    Here's a local luthier and friend of my guitar tech. He builds all kinds of crazy guitars and offers every option you can think of....including vintage pickups in modern, handmade guitars....


    http://www.luxxtoneguitars.com/
     
  5. Robert Herndon Project

    Robert Herndon Project Well-Known Member

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    You also have to remember this is Los Angeles California. I see crazy things here...Kids coming in for their very first guitar lesson with a brand new Gibson Les Paul and a tube Marshall combo amp...I started on 1959 Sears Silvertone.

    Most guys that I know who play professionally (as in studio work, not night clubs) are playing highly customized Valley Arts, PRS and older Music Man's.

    Seriously, the guy who does my intonation is busy all the time, and its nothing to see guys drop $5,000 on customizing a guitar.

    Everybody seems to be using the high dollar, designer pickups nowadays...some I never even heard of.....Bare Knuckles, Joe Barden's, Taku's, Lollar's.....and here I am dropping off my '87 Squire to have him fix the wiring I goofed up on a GFS puckup.

    I lived in Miami Florida for a while,, but Los Angeles is a very different place for sure...
     
  6. Robert Herndon Project

    Robert Herndon Project Well-Known Member

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    I'm with you on all points. Growing up in a professional musician home, I've been exposed to lots of guitars...some cheap and some very costly collected pieces.

    In 2011, I recorded a song I wrote in 1997 called "Slide - Tribute to the Kings of Delta Blues." For the slide part in this song, I contacted a friend and borrowed a vintage 1928 National Triolian Resophonic from a friend's collection just to play that part. It was old, had rusty strings and was generally awful, but it gave me the tone I was after.

    I remember when mom recorded her album at Buck Owens Studio in Bakersfield back in 1979. There were guitars everywhere.

    I remember there was an old Les Paul in the rack and they pulled it out for one of the guitar parts on one of my mom's songs. I was invited to play it and I remember it just being awful. It had fret buzz on the E/A strings, the neck had a hump in it and it buzzed a lot when plugged in.

    It looked awful too. Yhe rear cover plate was taped on and I remember asking Terry Kristofferson why he was using it.

    In short, he told me that they only use it for lead work because it had a certain tone. They all joked about how you have to retune it after every few notes, but it did have a very good sound.

    I have no interest in collector pieces. They have their place, but I will take a modern, quality instrument every time.

    Like I grew up driving old "classic" cars and I have absolutely no desire to own one today....
     
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  7. BowerR64

    BowerR64 Well-Known Member

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    I dont care for the design of the headstock IMO that is the only bad part of the LP, if the strings had a straight string pull everything would be better about it. Thats why EVH designed the one he built, it has the body similar to the LP with the strat style neck but with the straight string pull. His still sounds like a hot rod strat IMO.

    The sound of the LP imo is worth the fight to keep it in tune. Some seem to be better then others at staying intune and i think it takes a little patience.
     

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