Are my ears deceiving me?

EJstrat&JVM

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With a 6000 grit light sanding? Sorry I don't buy that anyone can hear that unless they think they can up front.
Unfinished or heavily worn guitars should therefore be miles brighter.
Possibly cleaning it helped if it was extra grungy.
I don't know how anyome can play filthy guitars.
6000 grit? Consider that a gibson varnish is not as thick as other ones. As I said it's very subtle, but the difference is there, it's like removing cement from wood, something changes to resonance. Can you hear it and prove it? Maybe on a new guitar you can't prove it, but if the sanding occurs to a guitar that you played years and years, you would notice the subtle difference in sound.
 

purpleplexi

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I thought about the wall current. Usually my rig sounds brighter in the morning. If I play in the evening when the world has their TVs on it sounds a little darker. I cleaned/sanded it in the afternoon and played it in the evening so that's not normal. I thought it might be my ears but I didn't do anything in the couple of hours that might change how I hear but of course you never know.
Tried it again last night. Still sounds brighter. Maybe I'll try the same thing on my other LP and see what happens.
 

JamminJeff

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There is this British guitarist on YouTube named Dave Simpson. Dave uses only solid state amps because he says solid state amps sound the same every day whereas valve amps sound different from day to day and sometimes even different the same day due to voltage irregularities.
Dave is fun to watch sometimes, but my guess is he isn't patient enough to allow the tubes/valves to completely warm up. Personally, I turn on my amps at least 15 minutes before I play. Sometimes that's not enough. Some tube/valve amps take longer than others for the heaters to do their job.

He also seems to like a certain pre-amp tone with some effects processing which is fine. Dave also said in one of his videos that he doesn't play loud in the room and respects his neighbors, etc.

There's no wrong answer here, it's just preference, plus with yootoobs horrible compression, you can't really hear the qualities of a fire breathing amp anyway.

It's like shoving a bowling ball down a garden hose.
 

Jethro Rocker

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I thought about the wall current. Usually my rig sounds brighter in the morning. If I play in the evening when the world has their TVs on it sounds a little darker. I cleaned/sanded it in the afternoon and played it in the evening so that's not normal. I thought it might be my ears but I didn't do anything in the couple of hours that might change how I hear but of course you never know.
Tried it again last night. Still sounds brighter. Maybe I'll try the same thing on my other LP and see what happens.
One's long term memory for sound is poor as well, you would almost have to have played it, sanded, played it right after. Otherwise too mamy variables IMO.
Power makes more sense to me by far.
 

Ray Baker

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I cleaned my guitar. Which I never do. Orville by Gibson sunburst LP. Anyway it came out shiny. Which I don't like. So I found some 6000 micromesh and and used it to slightly dull the top. Looked better. Thing is when I plugged it in it sounded different. Somehow it sounds brighter. Noticeably. Thinking my ears had gone stupid I checked all the settings but nothing had changed. So I took the micromesh and did the back of the neck and it sounded brighter again. I don't know WTF is going on here. All I've done is very slightly dulled the finish - I haven't removed it or anything like that.
The good thing is that the neck pickup on this guitar has always been very dark - not completely unusable but only suitable for certain tunes. Now it has a lot more detail and clarity which is nice. I have to drop the tone control on the bridge but it still sounds good. Still don't unnerstand what's going on.....
Is it possible that during this unprecedented cleaning event you also cleaned out your ears? Maybe you got carried away, sprayed a Q-Tip and in your ear it went. Years of gunk swabbed away!
 

nickfox

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That shocked me too, as I'm very familiar with OSHA noise standards (which say 85dB is safe for up to 8 hours a day). There was always a part of the medical community that thought OHSA's standards were a little lax, with many thinking a 6 hour limit for 85dB was safer.

So I Googled to see if there's been a radical shift in medical consensus. The most conservative standard I could find was the CDC's recommendation of 2 hours per day at 85dB. But that's not widely cited and OSHA's limit remains 8 hours per day at 85dB.

I saw the ENT doctor again yesterday and asked him about his comment about how long you can safely stay at 85dB. I also asked him why there was such a huge discrepancy between his recommendations for me and the OSHA standards that we are familiar with.

He said those standards are government standards for the workplace, NOT doctor recommendations. He said that 1) you are older and 2) you already have hearing damage (tinnitus and now sensitivity to high frequencies), therefor you need to be more careful.

And then he said something that kind of scared me. He said, "but you can do whatever you want..."

My first thought was NO, I don't want to do that!

I found an article on wikipedia that discusses in part this sensitivity to high frequencies.


The gist of the story is that we're getting older and we need to be more careful about our hearing. This sensitivity to high frequencies can affect how well we are able to understand people in conversation...


PS: and thank you to @WellBurnTheSky for discussing with me in PM the differences between the American regulations and French (also EU) regulations.
 
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Derek S

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I've learned as others have, some tube amps are more susceptible to the power source than others and that can vary day to day which obviously will effect your amps bias (try checking yours when it sounds off and see if it has "drifted", betting it has). My old Splawn Quick Rod was HORRIBLE with this, some days it was normal and sounded great, sometimes without touching a thing it was WAY off, much brighter, had a hint of fizz, weaker punch, etc...eventually I realized it was the power source (I supposed being weaker?). I never really found a solution, I would just get pissed off, put the guitar down for the day and eventually sold the thing.

The good news here is you have great ears to notice the difference so quickly (whatever is actually causing it).
 
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purpleplexi

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Well I've been playing it ever since and it's still the same. Neck pickup is bright and clear - which it never was - and the bridge is too bright. This guitar has always been hard to balance the pickups - eq the amp for the bridge and the neck is muddy. I don't do it the other way because I mostly use the bridge. To try to even it up I put a .47pf cap on the bridge. Definitely took the edge off. Still playing it - it's quite different. Sort of has a slightly fuzz tone thing going on when it's overdriven. I like it but can't decide if it's a tone I want all the time.
 

purpleplexi

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Got my arse into gear and re-eq'd the amp to suit. Sounds great now. Love it. Keeping it. Sorted.
 

axe arsenal

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6000 grit? Consider that a gibson varnish is not as thick as other ones. As I said it's very subtle, but the difference is there, it's like removing cement from wood, something changes to resonance. Can you hear it and prove it? Maybe on a new guitar you can't prove it, but if the sanding occurs to a guitar that you played years and years, you would notice the subtle difference in sound.
Most guys here don't take this seriously but I have a Strat where I have taken the paint off and it sounds a lot brighter now. I also have a Highway One Fender Strat and that one is also bright, I am sure it's because of the thinner paint of that model.
So, I believe that OP is right!
 

paul-e-mann

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Well I've been playing it ever since and it's still the same. Neck pickup is bright and clear - which it never was - and the bridge is too bright. This guitar has always been hard to balance the pickups - eq the amp for the bridge and the neck is muddy. I don't do it the other way because I mostly use the bridge. To try to even it up I put a .47pf cap on the bridge. Definitely took the edge off. Still playing it - it's quite different. Sort of has a slightly fuzz tone thing going on when it's overdriven. I like it but can't decide if it's a tone I want all the time.
I saw something interesting Fender is doing on some guitars, an S1 switch to turn on Strat bridge and neck pickup together, I'm very curious about this if it will make a Strat bridge pickup more usable.

Currently I have a few 4 hole amps, all I gotta do is jumper the channels and I have total control over my guitar tone.
 

Dr Frost

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Well, to make a similar point; I clearly remember a day in March 2016 when sitting on the couch I realized I had to hold the evening newspaper one armslength from my eyes and still had trouble reading the darned thing. That decay in performance (one eye suffering from astigmatism) came unbeliveably fast and I have worn glasses since April the same year...

My late dad was right, from 40 and onwards it´s all downhill with us. Still, have had my hearing checked again when I turned 50 and had to do the test twice as the did not believe I had no measurable loss (which I don't have) and that me claiming to still hear the bats hunt at my country house on weekends was fairytales, to put it polite and mildly.
Incredible after a whole live of playing guitar and touring, doing live sound resulting in even more touring, which ended to include all continents except Australia (heard the bugs have beaks there so I did not dare to visit) and at the same time running my repair-shop, adding some 40 years of repairing, customising, building and hence testing literarily thousands of amps at volume using my ears as final checking tool.

So no rule is without exception I guess, btw how did those checks turn out for you ?
 
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ELS

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Could maybe even be a difference in voltage going to your amp.
if it's a tube rectifier, definitely. they seem to sound different every day, especially if it's on the way out.
 

purpleplexi

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Originally noticed it on my SV20. Using the DSL at the moment and frankly I'm struggling with it again. Can't seem to get comfortable with it. Maybe I need to go nuts and change my strings.....
 


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