10 Scientific Reasons You Should Play The Guitar

Discussion in 'The Backstage' started by Gianni, Dec 3, 2016.

  1. Gianni

    Gianni Well-Known Member

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    But first, see how playing an instrument benefits your brain. :yesway:



    10 Scientific Reasons You Should Play The Guitar
    A six-string solution for a healthier mind, body, and libido
    BY WILL LEVITH January 6, 2014
    (www.menshealth.com/health/10-reasons-play-guitar)

    Have you ever wondered why guitarists seem so laid back and loose on stage? Some shredders even appear to be immortal, like the Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards. Maybe they just have access to really good doctors, but here’s another potential explanation: The axe might be as powerful as anything inside the medicine cabinet. Strapping on a Fender could boost your brainpower, sex life, six-pack, and more.

    FEEL SERIOUS PLEASURE
    Who needs groupies? Simply plugging in your guitar, playing it, and listening to the music you’re creating can make you feel good—orgasmically so. According to a neuroscientific study from McGill University, hearing music triggers the release of dopamine in the brain, the same chemical that’s released during sex. That’s like musical masturbation.

    WAVE AWAY STRESS
    Whether it’s your boss or bills that give you anguish, grabbing your Gibson can help zap stress. A dual study from the Mind-Body Wellness Center and Loma Linda University School of Medicine and Applied Biosystems found that stress can be reduced on a genomic level by playing an instrument. Rocking out actually reverses your body’s response system to pressure.

    SEND PAIN PACKING
    Forget popping pills: If you live with chronic pain, reach for a pick. According to a study from the University of Utah’s Pain Research Center, listening to music—and in this case, your own sweet licks—can take your mind off, and thereby reduce, pain.

    SHARPEN YOUR MIND
    Did Einstein secretly shred? A new Scottish study says if you play the guitar—or any musical instrument, for that matter—you’re more likely to have sharper brain function, which can help guard against mental decline in the future. Open a songbook and study up.

    TOUGHEN YOUR TICKER
    Rockers have killer chops—and cardiovascular systems: Researchers from the Netherlands found that patients who practiced music for more than 100 minutes a day showed a significant drop in blood pressure and a lower heart rate than those who didn’t. Three of the test subjects? Guitarists.

    SEDUCE TOTAL STRANGERS
    Can’t wail yet? Don’t worry. Just carrying a guitar case can seriously boost the odds of women wanting you—even if they’re total strangers, finds recent research in Psychology of Music. How come? Studies show women associate musical ability with intelligence, commitment, hard work, and physical prowess—and ladies associate all those qualities with your ability to earn money, the researchers say.

    WOO MORE WOMEN
    More proof you don’t need actual skills to score chicks: Israeli researchers recently sent friendship requests from a good-looking guy to 100 attractive, single women. In half the requests, the guy was holding a guitar. In the other half, he wasn’t. Only 5 of 50 women accepted a friendship request from the guitar-less guy, while the man with the axe scored 14 attractive new “friends,” according to the study. The reason: Musical ability is linked to manliness.

    STRIKE IT RICH
    You might not make it in the music biz, but your guitar could still help you earn the big bucks: Researchers from Michigan State University found that musicians who picked up an instrument at an early age and continued nurturing their craft throughout adulthood had a better chance of launching successful invention—logging patents, building businesses, and publishing pieces.

    BUILD MORE BRAINPOWER
    Stuck at work without your six-string? You’re still giving your brain a workout: According to a Cambridge University study, musicians continue being creative even when they’re not playing their instruments. Researchers found that performers visualize music in terms of its shape, and then process that as a form of practice. Most don’t see it as such, but it’s a highly creative way of learning.

    RECORD YOURSELF, REWARD YOURSELF
    Oftentimes, guitarists will record their sessions or demo songs; that way, they can go back and practice them. But bring your recordings to the gym and you might see a physical benefit: Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences found that music doesn’t just make for solid background noise while working out—it actually made exercising less exhausting for study participants.
     
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  2. Marshall Stack

    Marshall Stack Well-Known Member

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    Downside of playing guitar...

    Develop serious condition called Gear Aquisition Syndrome.
     
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  3. Gianni

    Gianni Well-Known Member

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    Well, all medicines have side effects, but when it comes to guitar-playing, the side effect (GAS) is, amazingly, as good for you as the medicine itself, and treatments like this don’t come cheap, mate. ;)
     
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  4. MexicanMike

    MexicanMike Well-Known Member

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    I think musicians are generally smarter than most people, not necessarily on an academic or an IQ level, but definitely brilliant in our own ways.
     
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  5. tonetrain

    tonetrain Well-Known Member

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    If playing guitar gave me orgasms I would practice like I need to
     
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  6. Vinsanitizer

    Vinsanitizer Forum Support Spec. Double Platinum Supporting Member VIP Member

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    Emotional intelligence.
     
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  7. Gianni

    Gianni Well-Known Member

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    Musicians’ Brains Stay Sharp As They Age
    (https://fyiliving.com/mental-health/musicians-brains-stay-sharp-as-they-age)

    Study Conclusion
    Engaging in musical activity for most of one’s lifetime significantly helps remember names, and enhances nonverbal memory, the ability to work based on what one sees, and mental agility during old age. The habit of physical exercise, in addition to musical involvement, further adds to mental lucidity in old age. Starting musical training early and continuing it for several years has a favorable effect on mental abilities during old age. Musical training also seems to enhance verbal prowess and the general IQ of a person, although it is possible that people with higher IQ tend to pursue music more seriously. It is advisable to think about our lifestyles and change them accordingly to have a better chance at a healthy, clear-headed old age.
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2016
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  8. Gianni

    Gianni Well-Known Member

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    5 Scientific Facts Why Musicians Should Rule The Earth :cool:
    (http://musicalspa.com/blog/5-scientific-facts-why-musicians-should-rule-the-earth)

    Back in my 20s, I was often asked twice, what I did for a living. After over 12 years of making music for a living, I’ve come to appreciate that there’s more to music than just a simple hobby. These are 5 interesting scientific facts about musicians that might encourage to enroll yourself and your child in the next available music program:

    1) Musicians Are Smarter Than You Think
    Playing an instrument involves an orchestration of regions in our most primitive reptilian brain, the cerebellum and the brain stem, as well as the highest cognitive systems, such as the motor cortex and the planning regions of our frontal lobes. On average, musicians are constantly using their brains to engage in music activities. Reading music, for example, requires the visual cortex. Listening or recalling lyrics involves language centers, including Broca’s and Wernicke’s area, as well as other language centers in the temporal and frontal lobes. As musicians play their instruments, they are also refining their motor skills and exercising their motor cortex. Playing an instrument has proven to improve auditory discrimination and spatial and temporal reasoning skills required for learning math and science.

    This is consistent with school results, as first-graders with developed rhythm skills have been shown to perform better academically. Second- and third- graders who were taught the relationships between an eighth, quarter, half and whole notes scored one hundred percent higher on fractions tests. Students who regularly take piano or singing lessons for more than one year gain more IQ points over that year than those who don’t. On average, music students score higher on their SATs. Finally, schools that are producing the highest academic achievement in the US spend twenty to thirty percent on arts, specially emphasizing on music.

    2) Musicians Have Bigger Brains (and size does matter!)
    M.D. Ph. D. Gottfried Shlaug has researched musicians’ brains extensively. He has found that the front portion of the corpus callosum is considerably larger in musicians than non-musicians. The corpus callosum is a trunk-like bundle of neurons that connect our two hemispheres. An enlarged corpus callosum allows for more efficient communication between the two sides of the prefrontal cortex, where our intellectual planning and foresight occur. There is also an increased number and density in synapses in musicians’ brains. Schlaug also found musicians to have larger cerebellums and an increased concentration of gray matter. Gray matter is the part of the brain that contains cell bodies, axons and dendrites. It is in charge of information processing.

    3) Musicians Are Remarkable At Courtship
    In a clever study, women where asked, during their peak of fertility as well as in other stages of their menstrual cycle, to rate the attractiveness of potential mates based on written vignettes describing fictional male characters. It turns out when women were in their peak fertility, they preferred a creative, yet poor man over an average yet rich man. It appears that Mother Nature favors creative genes for procreation. This is consistent with other species. In songbirds, for example, the male of the species is the one that sings. A large repertoire indicates intellect and, consequently, potentially good genes. This explains why female birds ovulate more quickly in the presence of male songbirds with a larger… song repertoire that is! This is also consistent with UCLA’s research by Miller and Martie Haselton, who have shown that for human females, creativity trumps wealth, as creativity is very likely a better predictor of who will furnish better genes for their children!

    4) Musicians Are Better At Problem Solving
    Because the volume and brain activity in the corpus callosum of disciplined musicians is bigger, more connections between both hemispheres are established in a musician’s brain. This may be the reason why musicians often have higher levels of executive function, a category of tasks that are interlinked and include planning, strategizing and attention to detail, which requires simultaneous analysis of cognitive and emotional aspects. Through this ability, musicians also create, store and retrieve memories quicker and more efficiently. A recent study performed at Harvard showed that college music majors can block out distraction more successfully, thus concentrating better.

    5) Music Making Precedes Most Professions In The World
    Long before there were politicians, lawyers and even farmers, humans were making music. In fact, strong tangible evidence, like the fifty thousand year old Slovenian bone flute, strongly suggests we made music before we could even speak. The similarities in music and speech processing in the frontal and temporal lobes of our brain suggest that those neural circuits that are used for music and language may start out undifferentiated when we’re babies and later on specialize for specific tasks. Music is not only the activity that prepared our ancestors for speech communication and representational flexibility required to become humans, but singing and instrumental activities were very likely the ones that helped refine our motor skills so we could have the muscle control required for vocal or signed speech.
     
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  9. kinleyd

    kinleyd Well-Known Member

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    next.thing.i.know.jpg

    I am not yet a "musician" so this is completely an aspirational piece.

    From the 10 Scientific Reasons You Should Play The Guitar, I shall presently focus on this one, SEDUCE TOTAL STRANGERS (and perhaps comment on some of the others later).

    Not so much that I want to seduce total strangers, I am just enamoured by the idea that one can cast such a potent spell just through the beauty of the sound waves flowing out through your hands via the guitar. Wow, that's just gotta be awesome!

    So I've been practicing like hell, with a number of goals, one of them being to find out more about this spell. And I happened to mention it to my wife, in terms of how cool it will be one day to potentially have my clothes ripped off by adoring fans or have adoring fans rip off their clothes as they advance toward me.

    Now, my wife is a pretty skeptical woman, and she immediately doubted that would ever happen, even if I became a guitar god (at the same time pointing out that the odds of me becoming a guitar god are rather slim - yeah, wives can be brutal!).

    And my wife is also a practical woman. Even if I became good at the guitar - and even if women could be so charmed that they would throw off their clothes in my presence - she reminded me that I am over fifty years old, and more likely than not it would be women of my age advancing naked in my direction. Now, would I really want or like that?, she asked me.

    I have to admit, I'm not entirely sure I would want that.

    OK, so I'll have to settle for the other reasons... My wife really is a wet blanket. : (
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2016
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  10. Gianni

    Gianni Well-Known Member

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    Not true, at all! :nono: Just take your Gibson hard-case for a walk around town and see for yourself how many young women will look at you, and smile back when you smile at them. ;) That should give you all the motivation you need to practise even harder, :thumb: so as to one day achieve your noble goal. :lol:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2016
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  11. kinleyd

    kinleyd Well-Known Member

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    Your encouragement is appreciated - I shall pursue my noble goal. Practice shall be bumped up to 10 hrs a day!
     
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  12. Gunner64

    Gunner64 Well-Known Member Gold Supporting Member

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    I can't speak for you guys, but in a roundabout way it has in the past for me..ahh the good ole days..lol..
     
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