The Official Wilder Amplification Tech Article Thread

Discussion in 'The Workbench' started by Wilder Amplification, Apr 12, 2010.

  1. Jaymz E

    Jaymz E Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Jon, I really appreciate all the info you gave me, I am new to DIY amp maintenance. I've been playing guitar for almost 20 years and I always relied on a local tech to work on my amps. He would install new tubes and charge you for a bias job and even keep your old valves to use on future repairs. Take care and have a Happy Holiday
     
  2. Voodoo Amps

    Voodoo Amps Active Member

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    The only time we hard wire the impedance taps to the speaker jacks;

    A.) If the output selector switch is intermittent and/or is not functioning properly

    B.) Many of the older used the Bulgin "push in" connectors for the impedance selector. The female pins tend to become loose causing intermittent connection or no connection at all, this in turn causing damage to the output transformer (OT) and/or power tubes. This is why Marshall moved away from / discontinued the use of this particular connector in favor of the more commonly used selectors found on JCM800 Series, etc.

    Note with regards to the vintage push-in impedance selectors; Re-tensioning the metal may work but sadly more times than not the metal tends to be brittle and therefore breaks off.

    Replacing an shorted output transformer on a vintage amp is not only makes for a costly repair but may likely lower the resale value. As such we try to prevent this for our customers and also label the speaker jacks so it is clear what impedances are safe to use.

    For more info on impedances, safe mismatches, etc please visit the following link - Understanding Speaker Impedances


    Thank you;
    Trace Davis
     
  3. Norfolk Martin

    Norfolk Martin New Member

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    YES. if you don't keep a shorted plug in the jack of the guitar when it's not in use, electrons from the pickup travel to the end of the circuit at the "tip" connector of the jack socket, and fall out of the instrument (whereas if there is a circuit across the jack , the same electrons circle round and return to the pickup at the other end of the coil.)

    Many fine instruments have had their pickups sapped by failing to use a shorting plug.

    However, you do not need to buy a new pickup if you are foolish enough to allow yours to leak electrons. Take it to your local tech, and tell him the electrons have leaked from the pickup and you need them recharged. he will be happy to recharge it for around $20
     
    southbound suarez likes this.
  4. Jaymz E

    Jaymz E Well-Known Member

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    Jon, I have a preowned 2000 model-JCM2000 DSL 100, I recently changed it's original Svets with newer =c= and new pre-amp tubes (EH). After I play for about 20 minutes it starts making crackling- static type sounds even with the guitar volume turned down. The sounds are kinda in the back ground. Is this pre-amp tube related or something more serious? Thanks, J.E
     
  5. southbound suarez

    southbound suarez Member

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    I like this!
    Does anyone have a schematic to build your own specialized electron replacement/recharge device tool?
    Tools are the key ingredient that divides the pro and the consumer. Good pros have those specialized tools that prevent everyone from doing it. Otherwise women and children would be doing it.
    i repurposed the head of a very large sledgehammer to make my own universal specialized tech-tool. It works wonderfully for opening things up to see inside and how they work. especially useful for troubleshooting those most aggravating instances where the failure is intermittent!:applause:
     

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