Police Scanners

Discussion in 'The Backstage' started by JimiRules, Nov 3, 2019.

  1. Adieu

    Adieu Well-Known Member

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    Ppl just wanna get advance warning when the law rolls up on their lil plantation or cozy crack house with warrants, doggies, and riot gear

    The problem, of course, is knowing which agency in this byzantine web of alphabet soups to listen for...although I suppose sufficiently prosperous and sprawling advanced operations track em all
     
  2. pedecamp

    pedecamp Well-Known Member

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    Don't forget socks and undershirts are a good gift to ask for. :yesway:
     
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  3. JimiRules

    JimiRules Well-Known Member

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    I've got enough of those to last me into my retirement years. My parents go to those outlet stores and buy them in bulk!
     
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  4. pedecamp

    pedecamp Well-Known Member

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    Then you gotta ask for an SV20H or SC20H! :yesway:
     
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  5. Matthews Guitars

    Matthews Guitars Well-Known Member

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    For the area data you posted, any scanner that covers conventional VHF and UHF broadcasts will do.
    Unless you want to listen to MARCS. That requires a P25 trunking capable scanner. Fortunately, that's just about every scanner that's on the market today,
    as long as you're not buying old used stuff. If you buy anything new it should handle P25 trunking and most other formats as well.

    It is usually kind of boring to listen to police radio traffic. Until it becomes very intense and exciting, that is.

    My main use for it is to know where traffic is blocked or slowed down and avoid that area. If there's trouble to the north, I'm heading south.

    There are people who use scanners to chase the action and go to the scene for a first hand look. They are idiots 100 percent of the time.
    Stay away. Do not interfere with emergency operations. Do not put yourself or others at risk by being where you have no business when stuff is going down.
     
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  6. Micky

    Micky Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    As a licensed Ham Radio operator for years, I have listened to almost every type of Radio Frequency communications out there. Getting a scanner (or a transceiver that can scan) is just the beginning. Soon you will be upgrading antennas, and then more radios as this can become an obsession.

    I usually scan while mobile (illegal in some areas, and definitely illegal if used to commit a crime) to keep abreast of any problems in the area as well as to see if any friends are on the air. Your first step should be a list of frequencies and organizations, (looks like you already have one) and then you will become familiar with who is who on the air. You will figure out which frequencies are used for what, as well as who it is using them.

    Here in rural New England, as soon as the power goes out, I turn on the scanner to listen for the power companies and other organizations that might be responding. Imagine my surprise while casually listening one evening and hearing my name on the local police frequency! My son had been pulled over while driving one of our cars (registered in my name) and got a warning for an unsafe start (peeled out of a parking lot). It was not really as much fun as I thought it would be when he got home...

    Point is, you can keep abreast of a lot of things going on if you live in an area where transmissions are not coded or encrypted. Larger cities are using sophisticated methods to combat the congestion of thousands of users all trying to use a very small band of frequencies. Many places still use regular analog radio systems that are generally open to reception, so you should have a blast listening to things in your area.

    Some scanners scan a whole band of frequencies, so you may not even have to manually enter the data yourself. Ask or do your research before you buy anything too expensive.
     
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  7. JimiRules

    JimiRules Well-Known Member

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    When I was growing up my dad had a CB radio in the basement. A couple buddies also had them and we would get on and chat with truckers. It was pretty fun.

    Yeah, I'm going to do some research. I don't want to get anything too expensive.
     
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  8. Mitchell Pearrow

    Mitchell Pearrow Well-Known Member

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    During the mid 70’s I think there where a large number of people with CB radios, I had one in my van, and we always had one in the big truck, and when you talked to someone on a base station (with some money into their gear) you could talk to them for miles.
    You could always tell the ones with the big format because of the ping you would hear when they keyed the mic.
    Cheers Mitch
     
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  9. JimiRules

    JimiRules Well-Known Member

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    I think that's when my dad got the one I used. It was tube, I do know that. I remember hearing guys with the echo mics. Then there were times when I'd stumble onto conversations where guys would do nothing but make adjustments and ask the other guy how he sounded. One time we unknowingly got on the channel the police dept used. We were quickly told to get the hell off of it! We never made that mistake again!
     
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  10. Barfly

    Barfly Well-Known Member

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    Not here in NY and a lot of other jurisdictions. very few frequencies are encrypted but there's a whole lot to listen to. I have 3 scanners.. all old ones... but I don't use them anymore. I use an app on my iPhone that works just fine. Sometimes I listen while driving around my district at work and it's cool to know what's going on as I drive past a PD response.
     
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