New Product - Tilt-A-Speaker. Angle your speakers up or out in your cab

Discussion in 'Cabinets & Speakers' started by Sevenstringer, Oct 31, 2013.

  1. Sevenstringer

    Sevenstringer Member

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    Introducing a brand new product like nothing you have ever seen before. Tilt-a-Speaker was designed with the simple idea that most guitar amps and cabinets direct their sound at ground level. By simply putting an angled adapter between your speaker and baffle board inside your amp or speaker cabinet you can now direct the sound towards your ears where it always should have been. This very simple design solves the problems of tilting your amp back or putting it up on a stand or milk crate just to hear it. It installs easily in most amps and cabinets with 12 inch speakers and keeps them flat on the floor where they were designed to sound their best.

    Since the invention of the first electric guitar amp, guitar players have all had the same problem. They can’t hear their amps. They put a block of wood under it, lean it back against the wall or just crank it so loud that all anyone can hear is guitar. Other companies continue to use “outside the box” thinking as a solution. They’ve given you amp stands, tilt back legs and angled cabinets that all dramatically affect the sound of the amp. We took the thinking back “inside the box”. Why not just tilt the speaker up? Your amp is now still flat on the floor without the risk of falling over and you don’t have to carry around all those stands, legs or blocks of wood.

    It seems that the most popular speaker cabinets are the infamous slanted top cabs. The problem is…well they just don’t sound as full as the straight cabs. But you can’t hear straight cabs as well as you can hear those thinner sounding slant cabs. Well not anymore. With the Tilt-A-Speaker you can now have that full sound of your straight cab and still hear it as well as an angled cab.
    You can also aim or “clock” the speakers left (9 o'clock) and right (3 o'clock) for a wider stereo spread.

    Tilt-A-Speaker installs easily in most rear loaded speaker cabinets and many combo amps. Since we can’t test it out in every single amp and cabinet ever made we can help you to figure out if it will work in your amp or cab. You will need approximately 2 inches of clearance to install the Tilt-A-Speaker. Look inside the back to see if there are any components that may not allow the speaker to be tilted back, sideways or whatever angle you plan on installing it in. Look for transformers, tubes, large or low hanging amp chassis, protruding handles, etc. Provided you don’t have any of these issues you should be able to easily install this with common hand tools and without un-wiring your speakers.

    SCREWS NOT INCLUDED!!! You will need to get the correct length and size screws for your particular amp. Most modern amps and cabs will use either t-nuts with screws or common wood screws. These can be found at your local hardware store for no more than a couple dollars. In most cases you will need (2) 2 ½ inch screws and (2) 1 ¾ inch screws. Please make sure the screw is not too long that it protrudes through the front of your grill cloth.

    Patent Pending
    Made in the U.S.A.

    Can be ordered on eBay:
    Tilt A Speaker Angle Speakers in Guitar Cabinet Combo 12 inch 4x12 2x12 1x12 | eBay

    Or
    Contact me direct

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  2. SonVolt

    SonVolt Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    There's a Vinnie joke in there somewhere.
     
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  3. MartyStrat54

    MartyStrat54 Well-Known Member

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    Is this a Halloween prank?
     
  4. CaptainZero

    CaptainZero Well-Known Member

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    I was thinking the same thing!
     
  5. Hillcountry

    Hillcountry Active Member

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    So the speaker is still held in by the t-nuts in the baffle? This is a bad idea. Granted, longer screws will hold it, but if they loosen this will be rattle-city. Also, hanging a 5 lb speaker from the end of a 1.5 inch bolt will increase the torque on the t nuts.

    Just some thoughts from a cab builder.
     
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  6. chuckharmonjr

    chuckharmonjr Well-Known Member

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    Actually the tensional force on the T-Nut and the shear of the anchor versus the plywood hole
     
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  7. Hillcountry

    Hillcountry Active Member

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    Ah...thanks for correcting the technicalities. What he said!
     
  8. mickeydg5

    mickeydg5 Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    Finally someone took a shot at this. I and probably a lot of other people have pondered this. I have seen adpaters and spacers but never an angled spacer, so there you go.

    Are lock washers advised or does the wood fastener just dig in do the slight angle?
     
  9. javier pintos

    javier pintos Active Member

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    i had a 1x12 cab made for my avt combo once and had the bafle angled to have such effect it did work well
     
  10. damienbeale

    damienbeale Well-Known Member

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    Oxford ish sorta...

    And then there's that the screws are now at an angle to the T-nuts. Really bad idea.

    Not to mention the tunneling effect that the speaker is now going to suffer, making the cab even MORE directional and beam-y.

    And where's the gasket?

    This is just a bad idea all round.
     
  11. jmjck900

    jmjck900 Active Member

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    So it gives an angle about 5 degrees off vertical. Thats not much. I wonder what the angle would be on the top slanted speakers?
     
  12. Georgiatec

    Georgiatec Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    Looking for something I don't remember what.
    Reminds me of a "Dragon's Den" type of effort. :hmm:
     
  13. george76

    george76 New Member

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    I would imagine it is a bit of a tone killer. The speaker making contact with the wood is fairly important isnt it? in terms of getting the wood to resonate.
     
  14. Blacque Jacque

    Blacque Jacque Well-Known Member

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    Patent Pending ?
    Really ?

    Oh FFS. These things have been around since kids started fitting aftermarket speakers to the doors & parcel shelf of their Fiestas & Chevettes in the 70's, so it hardly qualifies as "a brand new product like nothing you have ever seen before". :hmm:

    Regarding mounting screws, you should be supplying correctly sized screws to mount the spacer to the baffle, plus proper fittings to mount the speaker to the spacer securely. There is no front gasket either.

    Structurally the design is not ideal, there are no reinforcing webs behind the flange and there are no tubular guides for the mounting screws (since you're not providing any additional hardware). What is there to stop the ring distorting when someone cranks the bolts down to stop the rattles ? What material are the rings made from ?

    IMO, the design is flawed, the product is incomplete & the marketing BS is just that.

    The cabs were intended to project the sound to the audience, not for the benefit of the player, that's what monitors are for, and the last thing a 1960a needs is a reduction in internal usable volume, however small.
     
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  15. Sevenstringer

    Sevenstringer Member

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    We did put a lot of time and research into this. We appreciate your comments and questions but would recommend you don't just assume things. We have tested this extensively and haven't had any of the problems that we are seeing mentioned here. First of all, a 5lb speaker would be a very light speakers. Most that we tested this with were over 7lbs. The bottom screws only have to be 1/4 inch longer and they are the ones that support most of the weight of the speaker. The angle of the screw has not been changed as there is enough play in the size of most speaker screw holes. (If we had increased the angle of it more we may have had this problem) We can not include screws as there is no standard size. Different manufacturers use different screws. We would have to increase the cost per unit to include a bunch of screws that you wouldn't even need. We have not had any problem with screws loosening up and have not experienced any rattle. Lock washers are always a good idea. There is no tunneling effect. The gasket is already attached to your speaker. You can always add another gasket on the baffle side but we haven't found a need for it. The angle is about 10 degrees. The top angle of a slanted Marshall cab is 11 degrees. This is the first speaker adapter for guitar speakers. Yes there are adapters for car speakers but they are completely different and used for a different reason. The design is solid. It won't cave in. No need for tubular guides for the screws. And that idea could cause a resonance inside the tube. We have a lot of thought into this. We spoke to many people in the industry who think it's a great idea. We designed it, redesigned it and tested it thoroughly. We have not encountered any of these issues that you are assuming. If we didn't know it worked we wouldn't have all this time and money into this Buy one and then tell us what you think. If you don't like it, return it.
     
  16. soundboy57

    soundboy57 Well-Known Member

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    I call BS, sorry.

    I have designed enough sound systems to know that not only will you lose the vibration transfer to the wood, but most importantly, you will have reflections off of the cone bouncing around the
    that cavity you create, mucking up the sound....especially at higher
    frequencies.


    It's a lot simpler to just tilt your cab back an inch, or raise it up on a road case.

    Not trying to crap on the excitement, but it's just not gonna sound great, IMHO.
     
  17. Hillcountry

    Hillcountry Active Member

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    I'm sorry if I started a storm on you…That was not my intent…but clearly I opened a door here. I like the idea and I think it is cool. My concern is that by angling the speaker and keeping the mounting bolts perpendicular to the face of the cabinet, you create an uneven force on the speaker frame that is not perpendicular to the frame itself. Yes you can crank it down, but that is not good either. Perhaps a better system is one where the "angler" mounts to the existing hardware, and the speaker mounts to the angler…that way all forces can be perpendicular.

    The people for whom I customize and build cabs generally want a simple system. Everything is mic'd so hearing yourself from the cab is not as important as how the cab will function over time. Durability and reliability are key. Speaker to baffle is a reliable, simple connection.

    Good luck to you - it looks like an interesting product.

    Hillcountry
     
  18. Sevenstringer

    Sevenstringer Member

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    While we appreciate all the input we respectfully agree to disagree. There has always been debates either way about how certain things effect your tone. Our opinion is based on actual testing. Not assumption. We are not trying to sell a product that doesn't work. If it didn't work, would we go thru all the hassle AND expense of getting a patent, testing, making revisions, paying 1,000s of dollars to get a mold made and spend months and months of our time to put out a product that simply doesn't work. The simple answer there is NO.
    Obviously our product is not needed for close mic'd situation where the player is monitoring his sound in another way. Players using in ears, etc.
    This is not needed by every player. It's simply an affordable option for players who want to keep their amp on the floor where it belongs and still hear it.
    We welcome anyone to try it out and give an actual review of the product.
     
  19. Micky

    Micky Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    How can you patent something that has been around for a long time?
     
  20. SonVolt

    SonVolt Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    I'm pretty sure no one on this forum is going to buy anything from any other member's startup. Too many people have been burned. People will take it seriously when it's on GuitarPartsResource.com or collecting dust on a Guitar Center shelf.
     

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