Modded Proco Rat 2....

Discussion in 'The Workbench' started by Michael Inglis, Jan 15, 2020 at 6:43 PM.

  1. Michael Inglis

    Michael Inglis Active Member

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    Resized 4.jpg Resized 1.jpg Resized 2.jpg Resized 3.jpg Resized 1.jpg Resized 2.jpg Resized 3.jpg I have a motto regarding pedal modding, if i mod anything its not a quality mod if it looses functionality. So to be specific it should be able to go back to stock at any time. So this is really a few mods but i was just really happy with the results so i thought id post about it a little bit and down the line post again with some sound clips, my playing is up to snuff but ive never posted audio files or recorded a demo yet so this would be a great time to learn to do those things. Anyways to the mods....

    1. Swapped out the OP07 IC for an IC socket with an LM308 (a legit LM308, ive tested the pins and its a real LM308. I bought it from Juried Engineering they are on every major selling platform and have good prices. Also they sell the LM308N's with a socket which is convenient).

    2. I added a three way switch (seen in between the filter and volume control) that does a few things. But its connected to the resistor capacitor pair that controls the high/mids gain. Its functions are as follows,

    Right: Stock

    Middle: Ruetz Mod (disconnected R6)

    Left: Replaces R6(47 ohm resistor) with a B1K potentiometer (at 0 its brighter closer to stock and at 10 its warmer closer to the ruetz mod) This pot interacts really well with the filter control. If you wanted to you could have it wired standard so it would be warmer at 0 more like ruetz mod and brighter at 10 more like stock but i preferred to have it backwards to mirror the backwards tone/filter control. The pot for this mod is on the back side far left. Next to it is another pot that is part of the next mod...

    3. Added another three way (slider this time) switch that stays inside the pedal. Its connected to the other resistor capacitor pair thats next to the R6 pair. This pair normally controls the lower frequency gain. Its functions are as follows....

    Left: Stock 560 ohm resistor (so in this position that pair functions as it would stock)

    Middle: Removes the 560 ohm resistor from the circuit so the pedal relies on the 47 ohm resistor/cap pair.

    Right: This position goes to the other potentiometer mentioned above. It replaces the 560 ohm resistor with a B1K pot just like in the Ruetz trim pot mod but for the other cap/resistor pair. I wasnt sure about this at first but it turned out great.

    5. I almost forgot, i also changed the stock 3.5 mm power jack for a regular dc jack. It turns out all the new rats have these so i kinda think it would have been nice to keep the 3.5mm since thats a feature that isnt on the newer ones. But with me its really all about functionality and theres a reason that Proco finally changed the jacks lol.

    Summary:

    Some of the settings can be redundant if dialed into the extremes (but only a very little bit of redundancy and it could be removed if you wanted by using more specific pot values but B1k's are easy to find and work great) but this redundancy isnt something anyone would notice. I did these mods cause i refuse to dislike a pedal or guitar or amp etc. I feel like most anything can be "corrected" to suit your preferences. The Modded Rat now reacts much more like a highly versatile fuzz. It really reminds me of a Keeley Fuzz Bender. With the two pots active you can really dial in the high/mids gain and low end gain to suit your preferences. If theres one thing ive learned or had reinforced through this mod its that the best way to start enjoying something your not in love with is to add some more versatility to it. That way your more in control of what you get out of the pedal, guitar or amp. Too many options can seem overwhelming but as long as everything is laid out well and intuitive thats not a problem at all. I should add this mod is not intuitive at all lol. Its my pedal so i know what does what but if i was modding this for someone else i would certainly label everything and likely add LED's to indicate when certain controls are active or not. Anyways thanks for checking out my post. If you want to do any of these mods yourself message me with any questions and i can walk you through anything you dont understand in more detail.
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2020 at 7:12 PM
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  2. pedecamp

    pedecamp Well-Known Member

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    I like the Rat I have one on my board, enjoy it! :yesway:
     
  3. Michael Inglis

    Michael Inglis Active Member

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    I should have added that a stock rat is an excellent pedal, you simply cant argue that point cause so many people have had such success with them over the years. But with any pedal really theres some set ups they work well in and others they work less well in. Im using relatively high gain HB's in both my guitars so being able to dial back the gain even more on the pedal helps. But when im using the coil splits in my guitar (which i also modded and sound just as good as real single's to me with a boost from an eq pedal in the loop, the high output helps with split coils) the stock rat is excellent. Also with vintage output humbuckers ive really enjoyed the stock rat. Its really all about getting everything to work together to its fullest potential when i mod anything.
     
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  4. DonP

    DonP Active Member

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    I have had a RAT2 for a few months, but a week ago I got a FAT RAT that had the socket and LM308 installed. I haven't A/B'ed them against each other yet.
     

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