Marshall DSL 100HR how does it work?

Discussion in 'The Workbench' started by George Marshall, Oct 7, 2019.

  1. George Marshall

    George Marshall New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2018
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    11
    Hi,
    I really like my DSL 100HR but I'd like to know vaguely how it works.
    I hope someone here can help me.
    What does the gain control, channel volume and master volume do exactly and in what order?

    Thanks much!!

    GM
     
  2. pedecamp

    pedecamp Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2009
    Messages:
    14,179
    Likes Received:
    10,862
    What does the manual say? I dont own the amp or have the manual, take your best guess and tell me what you think they do. I'm gonna guess the gain control controls the gain, the channel volume controls the channel volume, and the master volume I'm gonna guess since theres two each channel is foot switchable so you can control the volume individually on each channel say for lead boost. Do you have the 6 button footswitch to test my theory?
     
  3. George Marshall

    George Marshall New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2018
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    11
    My best guess is the gain knob affects the preamp tubes, the channel knob affects the power tubes and the MV acts like some kind of faucet that controls the wattage that goes to the speakers.... ??? So if this is the case, then in the clean channel if the MV and CV are both on 10 and the gain is used to control loudness is the amp functioning like a Plexi?
     
  4. George Marshall

    George Marshall New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2018
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    11
    The owners manual doesn't say anything about what the controls actually do in technical terms.
     
  5. SkyMonkey

    SkyMonkey Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2018
    Messages:
    1,765
    Likes Received:
    2,107
    Location:
    Indoors
    If the DSL40CR is the same layout as the DSL100HR then I think the tone path is as follows:

    Hands - Guitar Strings - Pickup - Guitar Volume & Tone - Channel Gains - Channel Volumes - EQ & Tone Shift - FX Send - FX Return - Reverb - E/Out - Presence & Resonance - Master Volumes - Speakers – Ears (what's left of them!)

    There is a sticky thread in the Workbench section explaining gain. But I will have a go at the 101 explanation:

    To my limited understanding, gain is basically the amplification of the input signal from the guitar. It sounds like a volume control up to the point where you run out of headroom for the signal wave, and then the signal wave is clipped at the top and bottom as the gain is increased, resulting in preamp distortion, but no more volume increase.
    The Channel volumes amplify the resulting signal again, but with far more headroom available (by design), so not much in the way of more distortion.
    The master volumes are similar to the Channel volumes but act on the power amp, and can result in some more distortion (of a more subtle quality) when the power amp tubes begin to be really pushed.

    The FX loop is serial, so the signal leaves the amp entirely and passes through any pedals in the loop, and then returns for power amplification.

    So please forgive my oversimplified attempt and use of incorrect terminology, and read the "What is gain?" thread for a more detailed explanation.
     
  6. Michael Roe

    Michael Roe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2017
    Messages:
    1,663
    Likes Received:
    3,933
    Location:
    Springfield, Ohio
    The gain would control the preamp gain. At least one of those preamp tubes is a part of the power amp section. The channel volume would control how much signal you are feeding the power amp section. The master volume would just be a redundant volume to allow you to have multiple volumes, like for a lead boost. Think of the volume knobs as more of a cut instead of a boost.
    Yes, you can set up your DSL to sort of act like a plexi style amp like you said. This will work for rhythm playing but for lead playing, different story. The BIG difference is in the design of the power amp section. A plexi will have boat loads of singing sustain (controlled feedback). The DSL will not! It can get close but will not nail it.
    Here is a good description of a DSL and Plexi power section:
    The DSL: Big bold scooped and modern sounding with little sustain. If you like your amp to chugga chugga chugga, then this is your best choice.
    The Plexi: Creamy sustain with more mids and more vintage sound and feel. Nowhere near as aggressive as the DSL.
     
  7. Dogs of Doom

    Dogs of Doom Moderator Staff Member

    Joined:
    Aug 2, 2012
    Messages:
    20,814
    Likes Received:
    21,755
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    a plexi, would be more like your rhythm channel (not clean).

    To make it act like a plexi, turn the master volume up, then, control the volume w/ the gain. As you turn up the gain, the pre-amp distorts at a certain point, but, doing it this way pushed the output tubes harder so, as you get pre-amp saturation, you also get power tube saturation. If you run the input tubes too hard, before turning up the power section, chances are, the pre-amp distortion will drown out the power tube saturation.

    The master volume makes it so that, you can adjust both channels, then use the master to control the whole amp. If you use the channel volume, then once you turn the volume on one channel, the other will need proportionately adjusted to match. If you get them balanced, the way you want, then use the master.

    Think if it as input gain. Even a mixing board will have a input gain. This will drive the pre-amp.

    Then you have channel volume. this is so you can get a specific volume for the channels & balance them out.

    Then you have the master volume, which is a global volume for the whole amp.
     
    Jon C likes this.
  8. George Marshall

    George Marshall New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2018
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    11
    Thanks for the replies! I've been using the crunch channel for most rhythm, OD1 for most leads and OD2 for real saturated Van Halen, Randy Rhoads etc. I like OD1 to be right on the edge of feedback, (and over when I want) so for the best tone I found I run the channel volumes on 10, gain on 7 and one MV on around 5, the other on 6 for a lead boost. I tried the MVs on 10 but it was too loud and the amp just didn't want to sing. It sounded too thin with the channel volumes turned down. P/R 5, B 3-4, M 10, T 6. A few weeks ago I noticed the amp seem to sound sort of dull and not articulate so I switched to my 2466 for the last practice and it was awesome. I brought the DSL home and got a Tung Sol for V1 and a balanced Mullard for V4 and WHAT A DIFFERENCE!! Real full, musical and articulate playing in my living room. I'm hoping I got the tube placement right. Does anyone know if looking at the back of the amp V1-V4 runs L - R? V1 has the metal shield. Thanks much!

    GM
     
    Jon C and SkyMonkey like this.
  9. SkyMonkey

    SkyMonkey Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 28, 2018
    Messages:
    1,765
    Likes Received:
    2,107
    Location:
    Indoors
    V1 is farthest to the right with a shield over it. The rest follow in order to the left. This is for DSL40CR. Invert for DSL100HR.
     
    Jon C likes this.
  10. George Marshall

    George Marshall New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2018
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    11
    OK thanks. I got it right. The new tubes made a big difference in tone. I was really surprised. The amp is more quiet now too. It now sounds way better with more articulation, definition to notes and better harmonics.
     
    SkyMonkey and Jon C like this.
  11. Jon C

    Jon C Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2017
    Messages:
    1,372
    Likes Received:
    2,373
    Location:
    Wa State
    Maico 501 ???
     
  12. George Marshall

    George Marshall New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2018
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    11
    Modernized 81/490. Ohlins forks, disc brakes front and rear.
     
    Jon C likes this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice