Looking For A Noise Gate What Should I Get?

Discussion in 'The Tone Zone' started by Jeff Main, Sep 12, 2017.

  1. Jeff Main

    Jeff Main New Member

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    Hi Guys

    Im looking for a good noise gate peadl that wont break the bank what should I get?

    Thank you
    Jeff
     
  2. MonstersOfTheMidway

    MonstersOfTheMidway Well-Known Member

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    Hello.

    Quite honestly, there's lots to choose from, and the price range also varies. I don't think you'll have to compromise too much on price versus things like features, sound quality, user-friendly, etc.

    Some quick suggestions that might fit your needs:
    1. M195 Noise Clamp by MXR is a popular choice; it's easy to use and very inexpensive (around $100).
    2. NS2 Noise Suppressor from Boss is another popular and inexpensive choice (also around $100).
    3. The Silencer from Electo-Harmonix (around $60 most places) has some nice features.

    There's certainly more to choose from, but the price range will likely be well above $100. For example, ISP Technologies makes two very popular ng/ns pedals: Decimator 2 and Decimator 2 G-String. Rocktron also makes some great ng/ns devices. Some models might be pricey, but they have a good reputation in regards to features, sound quality, easy to use, and build quality.

    Some questions:
    1 .Do you have experience with any particular noise gate/noise suppression devices?
    2. Which format do you prefer noise gate/suppressor: pedal, rack, or multi-effects?
    3. What amplifier(s) are you playing to gate?
    4. What devices create the most noise in your signal?

    You may not need a ng/ns if you can make some simple and inexpensive changes, such as better quality cables or a different power source for your pedals. You should strive to eliminate as much noise as you can through practical and common sense solutions, but even after that you still might need a little help from time to time, which is why I chose to use a ng/ns.

    It's important to note that everyone's needs are different. Here's some design features that I've found most useful:

    1. Loop feature. Some (but not all) ng/ns units feature a "loop" that allows you to place your most noisy pedals, such as overdrive/distortion/dirt pedal. Some people also like to use this loop in a so-called "x-pattern" allowing you to suppress/limit noise at two points in the signal chain (such as in the effects loop and before the amplifier's main instrument input. Depending on your needs, you may not need loop feature in a ng/ns pedal.

    2. Decay control. Most ng/ns devices feature a "threshold" control that lets the player determine how easily/quickly the gate will "open" and let the signal through. Some ng/ns devices also feature a "decay" control that let's the player determine how quickly the gate will "close" for lack of a better term. Ng/ns devices which don't employ a "decay" control usually use some type of internal program or algorithm that automatically adjusts how the gate closes by listening to some aspect of the signal. The designs vary, so you really need to know what you want. If you want to keep it simple, then a device with a single "threshold" control might be all you need. I've had more success with devices that let me determine how the gate "closes" but my needs might not be your needs.

    I currently use two ng/ns devices: the Boss NS2 and multi-effects ng/ns that's built-in. I don't always use either ng/ns (such as when I'm using the clean channel of my amp), but there's times when I use both (such as when using lots of overdrive/distortion/dirt in a high gain channel. I typically place the NS2 between the guitar and amplifier's instrument input. I also use a ng/ns in the effects loop. The ng/ns in the effects loop is programmable, which means that I can save different settings to presets and then recall those presets via footswitch. It might sound like a lot, but people that have played my rig found it easy to understand, easy to access, and easy to adjust. If you know what you want and spend some time looking, you will find exactly what you need.

    Hope this helps and good luck.
     
    Last edited: Sep 12, 2017
  3. ricksconnected

    ricksconnected Well-Known Member

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    good reply.
     
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  4. BanditPanda

    BanditPanda Well-Known Member

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    Most informative and helpful.
     
  5. JLBIII

    JLBIII Active Member

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    4K nailed it pretty good. I started using the Boss NS2 a little over 2 months ago. So far it works well for it's intended purpose. I have it on my pedal board right after a Shure GLX-D wireless unit. From there it goes thru a 25' Mogami cable into the input on a JVM 205 head. I'm running the amp wide open with master volume, channel and gain all on 10 in the green overdrive mode, so I wanted a signal with the least amount of noise going into the amp when I wasn't actually playing. Haven't tried it in the fx loop yet as I feel I don't need it at this point.
     
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  6. Jeff Main

    Jeff Main New Member

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  7. Jeff Main

    Jeff Main New Member

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    Thank you sooo much for the help

    Jeff
     
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  8. Marshall Stack

    Marshall Stack Well-Known Member

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    The other nice thing about the Boss NS-2 is that you can use it to power other pedals.
     
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