Is this setup a truly stereo sound?

Discussion in 'Marshall Amps' started by marshalltsl, Oct 15, 2019.

  1. Gutch220

    Gutch220 Well-Known Member

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    do you know if somebody makes an analog photo-sensor Univibe pedal with stereo outputs, tap tempo, and expression pedal jack for speed? I can't find one with all three (just two)
     
  2. zachman

    zachman Well-Known Member

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    No. That's typically used in between the guitar and the amp's input, so splitting the signal to stereo-- later on down the signal chain is preferable, and usually POST amp for stereo delays, reverbs, chorus, and the like. (For a old school tape delay or analog delay not so much, as they were typically used in front of the amp).

    My Eventide H8000FW will do what you're talking about, and the new H9000 will too, but neither is a pedal or analog
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2019
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  3. BowerR64

    BowerR64 Well-Known Member

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    A simple stereo chorus just puts a slight delay on the "wet output" and it sounds good imo, then throwing it slightly in and out of tune makes it even sweater specially when clean with chords.
     
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  4. SmokeyDopey

    SmokeyDopey Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    Can you be more specific? Because that also describes dual mono.
     
  5. zachman

    zachman Well-Known Member

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    Sort of... but not necessarily-- re: being fed from separate inputs

    Sure, here are a couple of examples of dual mono rigs:

    Ex. 1) A slave setup one type of 'series' dual mono use, and in that configuration Amp A is fed w/ the guitar, and sends the signal from amp A to amp B. Amp A's preamp section is routed to amp B's power amp section (Typically), and amp B is putting out a blend of amp A and B, while amp A is as though stock.

    Ex. 2) Guitar plugs into an A/B splitter, which feeds the input of Two mono combos, each with their own separate fx. (Also a dual mono application, but 'parallel'-- not 'series' like ex. 1)

    OR

    Ex. 3) one acoustic amp and one electric guitar amp w/ A/B splitter (also a type of parallel dual mono configuration)
     
    Last edited: Oct 19, 2019
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  6. SmokeyDopey

    SmokeyDopey Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    Yes, but some people split the signal, process the signal differently (hence, separate inputs) and it would be considered dual mono. I don't disagree with it being dual mono, but I would say the audio processing is a dual mono setup. But If I stand in front of that rig, I would say it has a stereo effect. I can understand though why someone would argue it isn't "true stereo".

    Thanks
     
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  7. zachman

    zachman Well-Known Member

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    Sure, lots of ways to do things. ;)

    Ex 1. Slave setup BUT also Stereo... Guitar plugs into amp A. Amp 'A' FX Loop send to stereo delay. Stereo delay Left output to Amp 'A's' fx loop return, Stereo delay's Right output to amp B's FX Loop return. voila

    Ex 2. Same as above but not using the fx loop send returns like above w/ 2 heads or combos-- rather into a stereo power amp from the L/R outputs of the delay and you can have a W/D/W setup or if using the LOAD down trick, using the attenuator you can eliminate the middle dry center image and have stereo.

    :cheers:
     
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  8. SmokeyDopey

    SmokeyDopey Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    True, but I never said the guitar signal automatically becomes a stereo signal. It was an attempt to reaffirm the notion that what would determine something being stereo is the way it is captured. "Captured" being where it is positioned in the stereo field.
    But that example (the dry DI signal slightly panned) is from a mixing standpoint and what constitutes something being a stereo mix. I can understand why one would have to look at it a bit differently when describing strictly a guitar rig.
     
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  9. MonstersOfTheMidway

    MonstersOfTheMidway Well-Known Member

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    I can't really add anything to the discussion other than to say I learned a lot. Thanks to all who contributed.
     
  10. StingRay85

    StingRay85 Active Member

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    Or you can daisy chain a few Marshalls and turn all knobs to 10, and be mainly creative with your hands?
     
  11. BftGibson

    BftGibson Well-Known Member

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    ster·e·o
    /ˈsterēō/

    Learn to pronounce

    noun
    noun: stereo
    1.
    sound that is directed through two or more speakers so that it seems to surround the listener and to come from more than one source; stereophonic sound
     
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  12. zachman

    zachman Well-Known Member

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    If you're trying to achieve stereo, that won't work either-- regardless of creativity or proficiency in your hands. ;)
    :cheers:
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
  13. zachman

    zachman Well-Known Member

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    Learn to read carefully. ;)

    Stereo" redirects here. For other uses, see Stereo (disambiguation).
    "Stereophonic" redirects here. For the similarly named band, see Stereophonics.
    Not to be confused with Duophonic sound.
    [​IMG]
    Time difference in a stereophonic recording of a car going past.
    Stereophonic sound or, more commonly, stereo, is a method of sound reproduction that creates an illusion of multi-directional audible perspective. This is usually achieved by using two or more independent audio channels through a configuration of two or more loudspeakers (or stereo headphones) in such a way as to create the impression of sound heard from various directions, as in natural hearing.[1] Thus the term "stereophonic" applies to so-called "quadraphonic" and "surround-sound" systems as well as the more common two-channel, two-speaker systems. It is often contrasted with monophonic, or "mono" sound, where audio is heard as coming from one position, often ahead in the sound field (analogous to a visual field). Stereo sound has been in common use since the 1970s in entertainment systems such as broadcast radio, TV, recorded music, internet, computer audio, and cinema.
     
  14. SmokeyDopey

    SmokeyDopey Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    I think this is the best example of how something wouldn't be considered stereo when explaining strictly a guitar rig:

    I'll see if I can replicate that example in my DAW, like an A/B test of the differences and why it wouldn't be considered "stereo" (again, specifically speaking in a guitar rig design/setup).
     
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  15. zachman

    zachman Well-Known Member

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    Use 2 mics, each on it's own channel, while recording your tracks-- and pan each L/R.

    Listen with headphones:



     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
  16. mickeydg5

    mickeydg5 Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    His example is stereo simply because each channel affects the the signal separately producing a different sound on LEFT channel and RIGHT channel. The incoming signal is mono but gets panned from one device/effect to the other. The separation of signal and space make it stereo.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
  17. SmokeyDopey

    SmokeyDopey Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    I agree with you Mickey, which is why I emphasize that I'm strictly speaking of guitar rig design, not in a mix context.

    The confusion is what you just described technically can be speaking of a dual mono setup too.
     
  18. zachman

    zachman Well-Known Member

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    Actually, my example is not mono because I was recording a W/D/W rig (Mono middle DRY cabinet in parallel to a stereo L/R fx section with L/R cabinets w/ 3 mics-- each on it's own channel, recording the corresponding speaker cabinet, recording with the panning effects happening live in real time.
     
  19. BftGibson

    BftGibson Well-Known Member

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    worked on the concept for about last 2 weeks.Fussing over mono & stereo during tracking. Come to realize the stereo came to basically mean R & L. In the interest of a mix..how you view the music being produced.,,how it come to the litener Kick-bass;vocals down middle ..then positioning things naturally around the mix to sound real in those parameter...headphones being not so tru to represent..but using our left & right ears as the 2 receivers of the sound...how darn natural can i make everything...in the end..wish would of just looked that definition up...anything bouncing around is manipulation of time & distance with panning back n forth...cause the natural sound is coming L & R
     
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  20. SmokeyDopey

    SmokeyDopey Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    My best attempt to articulate this:

    When speaking strictly of a guitar rig design, what one would state something being true stereo is both channels are interacting with each other. The simple definition of stereo is hearing 2 different things from 2 channels (channels being L/R speakers), but for a guitar rig to be considered stereo there has to be an interaction or relationship with those 2 channels. This sounds a bit broad because this technically can also be a dual mono setup. The best example I can think of now is that ping pong delay example. Having 2 different delays with different times can probably yield something similar, but it doesn't have the same ping pong effect. It isn't a stereo delay unit feeding 2 channels with a certain pattern/relationship, they're just 2 delays setup with certain times. Yes, it has like a stereo effect, and in a mix context that is undoubtedly "stereo", but in a guitar rig design framework, the latter example would be a dual mono setup.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2019
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