How do I price my Marshall Equipment

Discussion in 'Marshall Amps' started by Teresa Lloyd, Oct 21, 2019.

  1. Mitchell Pearrow

    Mitchell Pearrow Well-Known Member

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    Same here I have only taken one guitar there, and what they offered, I walked out with the instrument!!!
    Cheers Mitch
     
  2. dragonvalve

    dragonvalve Active Member

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    The thing about selling musical instruments, it becomes part of you over time. Not easy to let them go for something worth more to you than it is to them!

    Things are cyclical. And they are marked according to the present market, which sometimes isn't a true representation of the actual value.

    Then there's currency devaluation to consider.

    A place like GC, giant conglomerate with so many pieces of gear, they are in the wholesale business.
     
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  3. Mitchell Pearrow

    Mitchell Pearrow Well-Known Member

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    I ended up selling the instrument for the same price I paid for it
    $250 GC only offered $50.
    Cheers Mitch
     
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  4. dragonvalve

    dragonvalve Active Member

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    Better than the paltry sum offered by GC.

    But consider the value of the $250 when you sold it vs the day you bought it. If it's a fairly short time from when you bought it and sold it, then you broke even.

    Guitars are supposed to go up in value.

    But the value of the currency is another matter.

    $250 in 1960 is worth $2000 in 2019.
     
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  5. ricksdisconnected

    ricksdisconnected Well-Known Member

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    where the hell do you live that this is the case?
    if this were true, and its not, folks all over would be investing in these.
    it would be the one true guaranteed investment. NYSE would shit themselves.
     
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  6. Mitchell Pearrow

    Mitchell Pearrow Well-Known Member

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    I played the guitar for just over a year, I set it up with 11-54’s tuned to D standard, the instrument was a custom shop G400 in white and EMG pickups, it had a stress crack
    in the long dimension of the neck
    with a hard shell case.
    I got what I wanted, as did the buyer, so yes I broke even.
    Cheers Mitch
     
  7. ricksdisconnected

    ricksdisconnected Well-Known Member

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    thats why they offered $50. it was a risky buy for them. well for anybody really.
     
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  8. Mitchell Pearrow

    Mitchell Pearrow Well-Known Member

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    I should have been more discreptive in my stress crack remark.
    It was only in the headstock, and approximately 4 1/2” long
     
  9. dragonvalve

    dragonvalve Active Member

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    Should preface this with "in a good economy." The NYSE is being propped up by that "family" while the world's economy is in a tailspin being propped up by that same family. Every nation is bankrupt and trillions in debt. The only "value" is "derivatives" which is any debt turned into "future equity."

    Not everyone is interested in buying a guitar hence your generalize with a blanket answer.

    If the economy was better, sales would be as well. Just because people are not buying because they don't have the money, doesn't mean the guitar is not worth it.


    These guitars sure went up over the years.


    https://www.ebay.ca/itm/Used-Ibanez...ipping-Vhy9494-/163914587180?oid=163761746719

    $5,493.00
    [​IMG]

    Below, remember the days when you could walk into a pawnshop and buy this for $150? And it was worth $419 brand new from the dealer?

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/1963-Fende...295732?hash=item3fbb2e07f4:g:F~oAAOSwFfJccHAk

    BIN $5,999.00
    [​IMG]
    GIBSON LES PAUL CUSTOM 1963 (2) - Copy.jpg
    I bought one of these (with the ebony block as pictured) in 1971 for $300 from a pawn shop.

    The only reason prices are down is because no one has money and dealers will take almost anything to keep the lights on. Still doesn't mean the guitar's value has waned. It's the ability to purchase that has waned.

    The law of supply and demand.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2019
  10. ricksdisconnected

    ricksdisconnected Well-Known Member

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    still, why are guitars suppose to go up in price?
    that was your statement. what is it about them that makes them all become more valuable as each yr passes by?
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2019
  11. dragonvalve

    dragonvalve Active Member

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    A number of things: the limited number made, vintage parts, better woods before CITES, the guitar plays better after 60 years of molecular vibrational bombardment (played often). Made in the country of origin.

    As with works of art, they go up in price specially if created by noted artists and artisans.

    A "Leo" guitar will be worth more than the ones made after he died.

    http://www.stradivarius.org/price/

    "In May 2006, Antonio Stradivari’s 1707 Hammer violin was sold for $3,544,000, achieving a world record for any musical instrument sold at that time."

    Van Gogh sold one painting while he was alive. His mother used his paintings to cover up holes in the backyard fence.

    After he died is a different story.

    [​IMG]
    Price recently of Van Gogh's Starry Night? $100,000,000.00
     
  12. ricksdisconnected

    ricksdisconnected Well-Known Member

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    your not backing up your statement at all. your statement was
    "guitars are suppose to go up in value". that would be a blanket statement right?
    "guitars"
    i asked you why are they "suppose to go up in value" as you stated.
    what about them all makes them predestined to go up in value?
    if this were actual facts the investors of the world would be putting their money
    into the sure fire profits of guitar investing. there wouldnt be a single guitar in
    the used market anywhere.
    not picking at you but just dont want people believing
    that what they buy today will be worth more tomorrow. its just simply
    not the case.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2019
  13. dragonvalve

    dragonvalve Active Member

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    I already explained to you why.

    I showed you a violin made in 1707 selling for a large amount.

    Showed you advertised proof of old instruments made decades ago going for very high prices.

    But you don't seem to understand.

    I think you're mixing up which statement came first and expecting to use them out of sequence to try and make sense out of that.

    Your comment that "
    if this were actual facts the investors of the world would be putting their money
    into the sure fire profits of guitar investing. there wouldnt be a single guitar in
    the used market anywhere" is a fallacy of argument. A non sequitur and a circular argument.

    Your statement above is stretching and making assumptions that are not even related to each other!

    "investors-sure fire profits-wouldn't be a single guitar in the used market anywhere"

    Watch this below and see if you can follow the logic.












     

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