Glue For Tolex? & Other Questions

Discussion in 'Cabinets & Speakers' started by Gene Ballzz, Dec 23, 2013.

  1. Gene Ballzz

    Gene Ballzz Well-Known Member

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    Hey All,
    I know this has been asked and answered, but search was not my friend today. I realize that I can get "genuine" Tolex glue form suppliers and wait for it after paying a semi premium $$ for it claiming to be "Tolex" glue, but I kinda have to believe that other products readily available at Blowes or Home Cheapo are similar enough to be suitable? What works best and is easiest to work with? Spray, roll/brush-on, contact style? Also, any tips on how to do a cab with front to rear seam piping? I understand the concept, I'm simply looking for practical advice and procedural sequence. In this case I'm doing a head cab but have a few speakers to tackle also. Am I correct in the assumption that the Tolex does not need to be cut/seamed at each piping and that the only actual seam required is where the 2 ends of the Tolex meet?
    Thanx For All Replies,
    Gene
     
  2. blues_n_cues

    blues_n_cues Well-Known Member VIP Member

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  3. Gene Ballzz

    Gene Ballzz Well-Known Member

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    blues-n-cues,
    Yep, that's kinda what I figured. Still looking' for tips on technique, procedure, etc. on the piping seams?
    Gene
     
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  4. Georgiatec

    Georgiatec Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    I've never done one but, on a head box with with the piping on top, I would be tempted to start at the right hand piping groove go all the way around the bottom of the box and up the other side finishing at the left hand groove. Cut with slight overlap at each groove. Then cut a piece to do the top between the piping again with slight overlap. Once it's all stuck down and secure, run some glue into the groove, tap the piping into place and you should have a finish with no visible joins / overlaps. :thumb:
     
  5. blues_n_cues

    blues_n_cues Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    ya got me.not one of my talents,I just play 'em.
     
  6. Hillcountry

    Hillcountry New Member

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    Piping can be a pain - the trick is to make sure the tolex covers the channel that the piping goes in. So I would often rout a 1/8 inch channel for the piping and then make sure the piece of tolex covers to the far edge of the gap for both pieces. When you push or tap the piping into place the pressure should hold it in place. I wait until the glue dries to do this - sometimes a bulge can occur next to the piping of you do not.

    I tried spray adhesives and rubber cement. I have found that you need to wait and really let those glues dry before you attach them to each other - sometimes they end up gummy and not really sticky. This depends on your location and relative humidity.

    I, most often, use hot hide glue. It is a pain to mix, but is the most reliable for me in the long run.

    -Hillcountry
     
  7. george76

    george76 New Member

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    any contact adhesive will work. but dont go for the highest strength you can find, because there are areas where you need to glue down the tolex and then pull it back off to cut the seam. if you use a high strength glue it will pull all your wood filler off with it and possibly bits of wood too.

    also it needs to go on very smoothly & thinly so you dont get any lumps.

    the stuff advertised as tolex glue is good but way too expensive. find a cheaper alternative, look for low viscosity (runny) neoprene based adhesive and it should do the trick. use a roller and a couple of disposable paint brushes for the awkward areas.

    make sure it has gone completely touch dry before bringing the surfaces together.

    i found this stuff, which i havent tried yet, but think should work fine:

    http://www.screwfix.com/p/no-nonsense-contact-adhesive-1ltr/34758

    its only £7.59 per litre.

    i would not recommend spray adhesive.
     
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  8. jut

    jut New Member

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    I usually use contact cement. It's been the most reliable for me. Hot hide glue is also awesome, but a little more involved as far as mixing and heating- I would use this all the time if I had a good setup for it.
    I've also used pressure sensitive glue which worked fairly well, but was a little more messy. That stuff is nice though becuase you can reposition it fairly easy. Then you can just roll it really heavily and it will hold very strongly.
     
  9. HOT TUBES 70

    HOT TUBES 70 Well-Known Member

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  10. jgab

    jgab Active Member

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    I know this is an old thread but I thought I would post my findings as nothing is more frustrating about tolexing than using a glue that doesn't work worth a crap. I have tried most everything only to settle on one type of contact cement. I tried the 3M stuff. 3M 90 works good but super expensive, plus I wouldn't use a spray adhesive. Although it sound great, you always get patchy overloaded areas that tend to bubble; especially when using the heavy duty stuff like 3M 90 or Lepage blue can spray. They have a thicker spray which is good for avoiding over spray, but bad for even spray patterns.

    Use LePage blue can "brush on" contact cement. It is solvent based but the fumes are not that bad, especially when using it in open areas. It also doesn't harm the tolex. It is also available almost everywhere. It also has a nice setup time at 15 mins. It is also super strong and your tolex will not lift or loosen over time. It is the strongest stuff I have used to date and I have used a lot of different stuff.

    http://dashboard.lepageproducts.com//upload/english/product/LePage-Heavy-Duty-Contact-Cement .jpg
     
  11. george76

    george76 New Member

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    as mentioned in my previous post, you dont want mega high strength glue for tolexing. you will get into trouble when you have to re-lift the tolex for the corner seams, especially if you have used wood filler on those areas. because it will just come off when you lift the tolex up with that high strength glue on it, and may bring some wood off too.

    the expensive white glue sold by most places as "tolex glue" is actually not very strong at all, but works fine. you are only sticking tolex to wood, not sticking combine harvesters together.

    use the best glue for the job, not the strongest you can find.
     
  12. dash8311

    dash8311 Well-Known Member

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    lol, well said.
     
  13. jgab

    jgab Active Member

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    Really? I have been using this stuff for a long time and never had problems with lifting back tolex for the seams. Maybe you are waiting too long before doing the seams. No need to wait for the adhesive to fully cure before doing seams.

    George76, strong glue is important because the strong stuff will still be holding after 40+ years whereas the water based crap they sell now a days will probably be lifting and bubbling. Water based stuff, that never seems to fully dry, is good for working on your kids Halloween costumes; not for tolexing a road worthy amplifier capable of outliving the guy who built it. Experience is pretty important when tolexing too. If you have to reposition tolex after you applied it to the amplifier then you need a lot more practice before you should attempt an amp with the real stuff...

    Edit: Oh and just to throw this out there, Marshall and Fender either used solvent based high strength glue or animal glue.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2014
  14. Ken

    Ken Well-Known Member

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    I used the same spray adhesive I used to re-carpet my Lotus to re-glue long tattered pieces on my B cabinet. It's like liquid chewing gum when it comes out of the can and gives you a few minutes to arrange your piece before it dries too much.

    It's great for delicate work where you need to be sure everything is straight before it dries. I'm quite sure it won't remove the wood grain if it gets peeled off, and it's resistant to high heat and bitter cold. It may be the same 3-M product Blues-n-cues mentioned; read the can and see if it's for automotive carpeting.

    Ken
     
  15. 2x4x12

    2x4x12 New Member

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    How about plain 'ol Elmer's glue-all?
    [​IMG]
    I have a cab w/ lots of peeled sections (along the back edges of the sides) and several small rips w/tolex still intact.

    I don't wanna spend a fortune on glue since I only need a couple of tablespoons worth...

    Has anybody tried this?
     
  16. Micky

    Micky Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    Elmer's glue is water based, and may not work well for the long term...
    But in a pinch I would use it for small rips or tears. It dries clear.
     
  17. jgab

    jgab Active Member

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  18. blues_n_cues

    blues_n_cues Well-Known Member VIP Member

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    Bwahaha :naughty:

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. sgstratdude

    sgstratdude New Member

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    contact cement > 3m spray on

    I used 3m spray on for the first 2 cabinets i retolexed and I didn't enjoy that at all. The tolex wouldn't stay flat and the edges always seem to bubble up. It seemed I had to check on the cabinet every 10 minutes for 3 hours or so to reflatten the tolex until dried. The dry time is awful. Once dried though it held just fine.

    Contact cement is awesome. Line it up and put it on right and your done. Lots of time saved.


    ----------------
    edit

    holy necro thread....
     
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  20. maui

    maui New Member

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    I used this low order contact cement by lapage the green stuff worked out really well
     

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