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Unread 03-15-2013, 09:57 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Gibson Tim Shaw Humbuckers

What's the big deal with them?
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Unread 03-15-2013, 11:11 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Re: Gibson Tim Shaw Humbuckers

Gibsons first attempt at reproducing a PAF voiced pickup, they sound great (and were pretty close sounding) and they later officially became the 57 Classic we now all know and love.
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Unread 03-16-2013, 01:37 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Re: Gibson Tim Shaw Humbuckers

Yeah Mr Shaw had to do with Poly Wire and not Plain Enamel Wire cause Gibson at the Time would go the extra buck to get Plain Enamel Wire.
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Unread 03-16-2013, 07:30 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Re: Gibson Tim Shaw Humbuckers

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Yeah Mr Shaw had to do with Poly Wire and not Plain Enamel Wire cause Gibson at the Time would go the extra buck to get Plain Enamel Wire.
What?
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Unread 03-16-2013, 09:49 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Re: Gibson Tim Shaw Humbuckers

According to my searches, Gibson stopped using Tim Shaw humbuckers in 335's in 1987.

More valuable?
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Unread 03-16-2013, 03:00 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Re: Gibson Tim Shaw Humbuckers

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Originally Posted by axe4me View Post
According to my searches, Gibson stopped using Tim Shaw humbuckers in 335's in 1987.

More valuable?
A Tim Shaw era pickup commands a premium, but as I stated they became the 57 Classic.
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Unread 03-16-2013, 04:10 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Re: Gibson Tim Shaw Humbuckers

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What?
I was talking about how Mr Shaw went about making his version of the PAF

in fact here is story

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Whether it was rivalry between plants or increased market awareness, the Nashville plant jumped into the reissue action in 1980. By this time, one of the most glaring deficiencies of new Les Pauls (compared to the originals) was the humbucking pickup. In preparation for its first attempt at a reissue, Gibson assigned engineer Tim Shaw the job of designing a reissue of the original Patent-Applied-For humbucking pickup-within certain restrictions. "This was 1980 and Norlin was already feeling the pinch," Shaw said, referring to Gibson's long decline through the 1970s and early '80s. "We weren't allowed to do much retooling. We redid the bobbin because it was worn out. We got some old bobbins and put the square hole back in. We did it without the T-hole, which stood for Treble."

To replicate the magnets, Shaw gathered up magnets from original PAFs and sent them to a lab to be analyzed. "Most were Alnico 2's," he said, "but some were 5's. In the process of making an Alnico 5, they stick a magnet in a huge coil for orientation, but an unoriented 5 sounds a lot like a 2. They started with Alnico 2 and then switched to Alnico 5."

Shaw discovered that the original magnets were a little thicker than 1980 production magnets. "Magnetic strength is largely a function of the area of the polarized face; increasing the face size gives you more power," he explained. So he specified the thicker magnet for the new PAF.

Wiring on the originals was #42 gauge, which Gibson still used. However, the original wire had an enamel coating and the current wire had a polyurethane coat, which also was of a different thickness or "buildup" than that of the original, which affected capacitance. Norlin refused to go the extra mile-or extra buck, as it were. Enamel-coated wire cost a dollar more per pound than poly-coated. Shaw could change the spec on the buildup without additional expense, so the thickness of the coating was the same as on the original wire, but he was forced to use the poly coat. The difference is easy to see: purple wire on the originals, orange on the reissues.

Shaw later found a spec for the number of turns on a spec sheet for a 1957 ES-175. "It specified 5,000 turns because a P-90 had 10,000 turns and they cut it in half," Shaw said. In reality, however, originals had anywhere from 5,000 to 6,000 turns, depending on how tight the coil was wound. Shaw later met Seth Lover, who designed and patented Gibson's humbucker, at a NAMM show. Lover laughed when asked about a spec for windings, and he told Shaw, "We wound them until they were full."

The spec for resistance was even less exact, Shaw said. The old ohmeter was graduated in increments of .5 (500 ohms). Anywhere between 3.5 and 4 on the meter (3,500 to 4,000 ohms) met the spec. Consequently, Shaw pointed out, there is no such thing as an exact reissue or replica of the 1959 PAF pickup. There can only be a replica of one original PAF, or an average PAF. As Gibson would find out in the early 1990s, the same could be said about the entire guitar.

Shaw's PAF reissue debuted on Gibson's new Nashville-made Les Paul Heritage 80 in 1980. Compared to anything Gibson had previously made (which is to say, compared to nothing), it was an excellent reissue of a sunburst Les Paul Standard. It had a nice top, thin binding in the cutaway, nickel-plated parts, more accurate sunburst finish and smaller headstock, but the body shape, body size and three-piece neck, among other details, were just regular production. It appears that Gibson still didn't understand the demand for an accurate reissue, because Gibson accompanied the Heritage 80 with fancier versions: the Heritage 80 Elite, with an ebony fingerboard that had no relevance to the reissue market (although it did have a one-piece neck) and the Heritage 80 Award, with gold plated hardware that also had no relevance to the reissue market.
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Unread 03-16-2013, 04:24 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Re: Gibson Tim Shaw Humbuckers

IMO, they're good.
I'm glad that guitars with these may have a higher price tag but, to me, it's another conversation piece.

Thank you for the info.
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Unread 03-16-2013, 05:07 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Re: Gibson Tim Shaw Humbuckers

I do not see what the big deal is about them. I had them in my 1985 Les Paul Standard. They sounded good, but not enough that I would pay $300 for them, which is what a pair seem to go for on ebay. I think the 57's sound just as good IMO. I have a BB1 in the neck and a bb2 in the bridge of my LP and I actually like those better than the Tim Shaw's that I have. I think they are more of a conversation piece...something cool and not very common, but no holy grail or anything like that. If you can get a pair for $100 or so, I'd say go for it. $200 or more I would pass if all you are interested in is sound.
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Unread 03-21-2013, 07:27 AM   #10 (permalink)
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Re: Gibson Tim Shaw Humbuckers

TS P/U's are one of those things like an 808 overdrive.
They're good but doesn't make me do back flips.
I guess with the right buyer, these toys make or break a deal.
To me, they're no biggie.
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Unread 03-21-2013, 01:51 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Re: Gibson Tim Shaw Humbuckers

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Originally Posted by axe4me View Post
TS P/U's are one of those things like an 808 overdrive.
They're good but doesn't make me do back flips.
I guess with the right buyer, these toys make or break a deal.
To me, they're no biggie.
Yeah, but in 1981 when I bought my first brand new Les Paul, these pickups were a pretty big deal! I think they are a much more convincing voiced PAF than BurstBuckers and a lot of other "PAF" replacement pickups. I'd rather have TS's or 57 Classics than just about any other pickup out there.
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Unread 03-21-2013, 04:34 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Re: Gibson Tim Shaw Humbuckers

IMO, it like the emperor's new clothes.
Embossed T or dirty finger p/u's have a following too.
Just not me.
All my Norlin LP Std;s had stock p/u's replaced with Duncans.
At this stage of my life, I go with my ears and not with the new re-issue of an Edsel or the "find another" deals.
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